Talk:Berkshire Hills

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Comments by an anonymous user in the article says: Please note that this section should be properly known as the Berkshire Hills, not the Berkshire Mountains.'

So I am moving the page based on this information. -- (WT-en) Huttite 20:47, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
Good to know thank you --(WT-en) LebronJames23 05:44, 10 May 2011 (EDT)

Name?[edit]

Any reason in particular this is called "Berkshire Hills"? I've never heard anyone refer to the region by that name. Why not "the Berkshires"? This is what people actually call it.Godsendlemiwinks (talk) 22:55, 19 February 2015 (UTC)

That's what I've heard, too, and I've heard "Berkshire Mountains," not "Berkshire Hills." Mount Greylock, Mount Washington, Butternut Mountain, etc., are not called hills. Ikan Kekek (talk) 02:49, 20 February 2015 (UTC)

Proposal to rename to 'The Berkshires'[edit]

This page should match its Wikipedia counterpart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Berkshires

Countyparkour (talk) 12:48, 18 June 2017 (UTC)

  • Agree, this should absolutely be renamed to "The Berkshires". --ButteBag (talk) 03:26, 31 January 2019 (UTC)
Sure. Ikan Kekek (talk) 06:30, 8 February 2019 (UTC)

Unpopular merge proposal[edit]

I find the cities list quite difficult to make sense of, and I've been to the area! Any appetite for a little merging? The articles linked in parenthesis below would be merged into the bolded article, so imagine the text in the parens not being there. Anyway, I know I'm usually too aggressive with what I think is acceptable to merge, so please let me know if you have any ideas. Thanks! We'd need to add a new "Rural Berkshires" page, maybe something like this -> User:ButteBag/Rural_Berkshires?

Cities:

  • Adams (Cheshire, New Ashford, Savoy) — Distinct from its bigger brother to the north, Adams is known as the birthplace of Susan B. Anthony.
  • Great Barrington (Alford, Egremont, Mount Washington, Sheffield) — A compact downtown with restaurants, shops, specialty stores, banks, and more. Easy and safe mobility options often find Great Barrington a place on tourism top 10 lists.
  • Hancock — Home to Jiminy Peak ski area and Ramblewild, a tree-top forest adventure park.
  • Lanesborough — Gateway to Mt. Greylock and the Ashuwillticook Rail Trail. Small family-owned and operated farms dot this country town.
  • Lenox (Richmond, Stockbridge, West Stockbridge) — Home to Tanglewood Music Center, Kripalu, Cranwell, Canyon Ranch, Shakespeare & Company, and more. Downtown Lenox is bustling with artisan shops and lots of tasty restaurants.
  • North Adams (Clarksburg, Florida) — North Adams is the Berkshires' second largest city, boasting the expansive MassMOCA art museum as well as two state parks. The Mohawk Trail's western terminus can be found found right here.
  • Pittsfield — The Berkshires' largest city at around 44,000, plays host to shopping, museums, hotels, and restaurants. The former home of Herman Melville; author of Moby Dick, is here as well.
  • Rural Berkshires (Becket, Dalton, Hinsdale, Lee, Monterey, New Marlborough, Otis, Peru, Sandisfield, Tyringham, Washington, Windsor) — Get way off the beaten path in this quiet corner of the Berkshires.
  • Williamstown — Home of Williams College, The Clark Art Institute, the Williams College Museum of Art, and the Williamstown Theatre Festival.

--ButteBag (talk) 03:39, 31 January 2019 (UTC)

I tend to disagree. Each village has its own character. I certainly wouldn't merge Stockbridge with anything, nor Sheffield, and probably not Lee. Ikan Kekek (talk) 03:37, 1 February 2019 (UTC)
Agreed with Ikan. The problem with the "Cities" section is that half of the items on the list are either redlinks or regular non-linked bullet points. Eliminate those and you've got a much more manageable list. -- AndreCarrotflower (talk) 04:52, 1 February 2019 (UTC)
Thanks for the comments Ikan and Andre! In a certain sense I agree with you guys, but I remain generally confused.
I totally agree each village has its own character. Totally. But I don't understand how merging articles would demean the individual spirit of each location. What's wrong with enumerating the details in the understand section, demoed in my Rural Berkshires article?
I also agree this would be easier to remove the redlinked and unlinked cities from the list. But isn't WV supposed to cover every place on the globe without overlap? How could we delete the town names while retaining full coverage?
To think about it another way, my question is basically the same as the most recent Pub question. This user got the advice to jam everything into a small city article, with the option of splitting it out down the road when/if it becomes too big. This is basically the advice I'd like to get, lol, so I'm wondering what the differences here are. Thanks! --ButteBag (talk) 01:29, 8 February 2019 (UTC)
Lee has a 1-mile-long downtown now? If so, it's not rural, IMO. Ikan Kekek (talk) 01:48, 8 February 2019 (UTC)
Also, I think there's a bit of a practical difference between starting a new article and merging existing articles. I'll say this: Some of these places may in fact be too small for their own article. But, for example, in the case of Stockbridge, not only is it a small town of character, but I brought up the idea of including South Lee in the Stockbridge article. So on the whole, I'm not opposed to your idea; I just think you're going further than I'm comfortable with in that direction. Ikan Kekek (talk) 06:37, 8 February 2019 (UTC)
Ha, yes, I don't know much about Lee's downtown area. I was just reorganizing the content we already have to provide an example implementation. I still don't get why having an individual page for a given location affords it additional character. Maybe if there were some little template showing the population, land area, and elevation? That could make each place more of a "thing", when they're being show in list form. Anyway, thanks! --ButteBag (talk) 18:51, 10 February 2019 (UTC)