Talk:Fucking

From Wikivoyage
Jump to navigation Jump to search

I'm tempted to become a vandal and rename "DO" to "*******". I guess I have to remember The Lord's Paryer: "And lead us not into temptation, But deliver us from evil." -- (WT-en) Andrew Haggard (Sapphire) 00:44, 18 May 2006 (EDT)

Game of thrones accent?[edit]

The pronunciation description at the top of the article currently incldes "(imagine someone with a "game of thrones accent" saying the word and you are close)". That strikes me (a Canadian GoT fan) as nonsense. Does it seem meaningful to others?

Does it mean what I'd call a North of England accent, which several but by no means all GoT actors have? If so, why not just say that? Or would that be meaningless to many readers? Pashley (talk) 22:00, 18 August 2015 (UTC)

Agreed, this description is of limited to no usefulness. Game of Thrones is primarily filmed in Belfast with an international cast, so the correct term should then be an Irish-English or a British-English accent (but not an Austrian-English accent I guess?). Someone familiar with the pronunciation should pick which national or regional accent to correct to. Nicole Sharp (talk) 08:37, 20 October 2015 (UTC)

Well I think it was I who put that in there, sorry about that. It's probably that I meant the accent of either Bronn or one of the Northern characters from the show. The point it, it is more of an /u/ as in "book" or "huge" than an /a/ as in "cut" or British "can't" (I am aware that I have mixed up two different sounds in both cases). Though it would probably pronounced shorter than most Americans would think... Hobbitschuster (talk) 21:44, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
"Book" and "huge" have highly dissimilar vowel sounds, at least for most Americans. "Book" rhymes with look, cook, nook, rook, and schnook. "Huge" rhymes with "stooge", "Scrooge", and has the same vowel sound as "luge". So which of this two distinct vowel sounds is it more like? Ikan Kekek (talk) 22:27, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
I'd say the former. And I am fully aware of the fact that they are two different sounds. But most German speakers would write them down as /u/ (ignoring for a second whether you pronounce huge with an h or without and with an "y" or without). In Southern Germany and Austria (as well as modern standard German) "ck" means the vowel preceding the c is "short". In some parts of Northern Germany (today only realized in names of places and persons) it means the vowel preceding the c is "long" (e.g. Mecklenburg is pronounced with a long e, even though most Germans get that wrong) Hobbitschuster (talk) 22:36, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
OK, I will revert my own provisional reversion, then. But the fact that German speakers have trouble distinguishing the "oo" in "book" from the "oo" in "boo" is not helpful to English speakers trying to pronounce an Austrian town's name correctly, if you confuse the issue by conflating the two vowels as if they were the same. Ikan Kekek (talk) 22:45, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
They are not the same, at least not to a German speaker. But they are represented by the same letter. So some German speakers might say they are "variations of the same sound". If you ask a German to describe the difference between e.g. the letter "u" in "suchen" and "zucken" they would say "suchen" contains a "long u" whereas "zucken" contains a "short u". Hobbitschuster (talk) 22:49, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
I suppose some English speakers would talk about "long oo" and "short oo", too, but as you know, our language is not spelled phonetically like German is. The things I like best about German are that it's phonetical and capitalizes all nouns all the time. Ikan Kekek (talk) 22:52, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
I too like those two aspects of German spelling. I even heard of a study that showed "German" capitalization enhances reading comprehension and/or reading speed. Hobbitschuster (talk) 22:55, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
I wish we did the same thing in English. Too bad no-one pushed that reform through. Ikan Kekek (talk) 22:57, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
I am with you. Unfortunately there is not even an organization or individual with even the theoretic potential to get that done. At least for French or Spanish there are institutions that have theoretical power to do so. (Even if the reaction might be similar to the one to the 1996 reforms to German orthography) Hobbitschuster (talk) 23:14, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
There was Noah Webster in the 19th century. Ikan Kekek (talk) 23:16, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
True, but there is still a bit of debate about those reforms he proposed that were not adopted on both sides of the Atlantic. And some of his proposed reforms were never widely adopted on either side of the big pond... Hobbitschuster (talk) 23:25, 4 February 2016 (UTC)