Bankura

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Bankura is a city in the heart of the Rarh region of West Bengal in India.

Understand[edit]

Bankura, a city with ancient links, was developed by the British as a district headquarter and administrative centre. Many people visit Bankura for business and work purposes. Those visiting Mukutmanipur pass through the city. It is located in an intermediate zone between the Chotanagpur plateau and the plains of Bengal.

Get in[edit]

Well connected to Durgapur (45km) by road. Private and state transport buses are most convenient.

From Howrah (Kolkata), trains like Rajdhani Express (Bhubaneswar Rajdhani), Rupasi Bangla, Purulia Express, Chakradharpur Passenger, Samarsata Express (Howrah to LTT)-(Bi-weekly) are available. Puri Express( Puri-New Delhi), BaidyanathDham Express (Patna-Puri), Guwahati-Puri Express also run via Bankura. Passenger trains like Tatanagar-Kharagpur, Asansol-Kharagpur connect Bankura with major railheads in this region.

Buses run between Kolkata and Bankura. Regular bus services are also available for Malda, Siliguri, Purulia, Medinipur, Kharagpur, Tatanagar, Ranchi etc.

Get around[edit]

Cycle rickshaws are available for local travel.

City landmarks[edit]

  •    Bankura railway station.
  •    SBSTC Bus Stand and Garage.
  •    Bankura Court.
  •    Gandheswari River.
  •    Dwarakeswar River.

See[edit]

  •    Ekteswar Shib Mandir. The temple is dedicated to Shiva, also called Ekteswar. It was built by the Rajas of Bishnupur. The temple was built of laterite, but had subsequent additions of sandstone and brick. Charak Puja is celebrated in the Bengali month of Choitro with great enthusiasm. It is on the banks of Dwarakeswar River.
  •    Bahulara (It is about 22 km from Bankura and around 5 km from Onda). The Siddheswara temple at Bahulara is well known for its unique architectural style and exquisite ornamentation of the temple walls. The temple dedicated to Shiva, located on the banks of the Dwarkeswar River, is considered the finest specimen of brick rekha deul temple made in line of Kalinga architecture ascribed to Pala (medieval) period. Besides a Shiva lingam the temple has images of Ganesha, Jain tirthankar Parasanath and one of Mahisasurmardini deity. The exterior of the temple is covered with very fine ornamentation.

Do[edit]

Buy[edit]

  • Bankura is terracota country. There are artictically designed terracota panels on temple walls, some depicting Ramayana and Mahabharata themes, but simple terracota items as wall plates and ash trays are also readily available. The famous Bankura horse, now the symbol of Indian handicrafts, is available in various sizes, ranging from less than a feet to around three feet tall. With mounting tourist demand wood-carved versions are also available.
  • Bishnupur baluchari saris are wonderfully handcrafted.

Eat[edit]

  • Bankura has its own sweetmeat speciality - mecha sandesh. The Beliator version is more renowned. Another popular sweetmeat, pera, is better known at Chatna. You can look for these in Bankura city also.

There are a few but good restaurants such as Hotel Saptarshi (Lalbazar), Saptaparna (Chandmaridanga) and Temptation (Katjuridanga), where all kinds food are available at a cheap price.

Sleep[edit]

Stay safe[edit]

Go next[edit]

This city travel guide to Bankura is a usable article. It has information on how to get there and on restaurants and hotels. An adventurous person could use this article, but please feel free to improve it by editing the page
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