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Moselle Valley

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The Moselle Valley is a river valley following the Moselle river (French: Moselle, German: Mosel, Luxembourgish: Musel), which originates in the Vosges and joins the Rhine at Koblenz. The river and valley span three countries.

France[edit]

The upper reaches of the Moselle Valley (Vallée de la Moselle) is the French part of the Moselle in Lorraine. It stretches from the source of the Moselle at Col de Bussang in the Vosges and at around 730 m above sea level over the cities of Remiremont, Épinal and Toul with a river length of around 190 km to Metz. The Moselle is navigable from Toul. Here the western Rhine-Marne Canal flows into the Moselle, which is canalised from here.

Luxembourg[edit]

The Moselle Valley (Museldall) in the Luxembourg canton of Grevenmacher stretches for around 28 km from the three-country corner at Schengen (which gives the European Union's border control agreement its name) to Wasserbillig. The Moselle is the state border with Germany here.

Germany[edit]

From Trier onwards, the Moselle Valley (Moseltal) in Germany is characterized by a strongly meandering course with many vineyards on partly very steep slopes.

The two-part German part of the Upper Moselle section is roughly the part from Perl in Saarland to Trier in Rhineland-Palatinate. The smaller and around 10-km-long part of the Upper Moselle in Saarland extends roughly to Remich , the Upper Moselle in Rhineland Palatinate then extends for around 35 km to Trier.

The Middle Moselle is an approximately 120-km-long section of the river in Rhineland-Palatinate. It extends from the city of Trier to Pünderich above Zell.

The Lower Moselle (also known as the Terrassenmosel) is the lowest and approximately 100-km-long section of the river Moselle up to the confluence with the Rhine in Koblenz.

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