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South Australia - location
Map of the South Australian coastline showing subdivision into recreational diving regions

This article is intended to provide the already qualified Scuba diver with information which will help to plan dives in the waters of South Australia, whether as a local resident or a visitor. Information is provided without prejudice, and is not guaranteed accurate or complete. Use it at your own risk.

Understand[edit]

South Australia is a state in the southern central part of Australia. It is bordered to the west by Western Australia, to the north by the Northern Territory, to the north-east by Queensland, to the east by New South Wales, to the south-east by Victoria, and to the south by the Great Australian Bight and the Indian Ocean. Most of the people live in the state capital, Adelaide, with most of the remainder settled in fertile areas along the south-eastern coast and River Murray.

South Australia is known as a state of festivals and of fine wine. The state's economy centres on the agricultural, manufacturing and mining industries.

General topography[edit]

According to Australian maps, South Australia's south coast is on the Southern Ocean, but official international consensus defines the Southern Ocean as extending north of Antarctica only as far as 60°S or 55°S, at least 17 degrees of latitude short of the southernmost point of South Australia, so the coast is on the Indian Ocean, but most South Australians use the term 'Southern Ocean'.

The coastline includes cliffs along the Great Australian Bight and the western side of Eyre Peninsula, but is less rugged on Spencer Gulf and Gulf St Vincent, Yorke Peninsula, Fleurieu Peninsula, Encounter Bay and The Coorong.

Kangaroo Island which is Australia's third largest island, lies off the centre of the state's coast.

Climate, weather and sea conditions[edit]

Map showing the marine weather forecast areas of South Australia

The northern part of the state has arid or semi-arid climate.

The southern coastal part of the state, from the Eyre peninsula and Spencer gulf southwards has a Mediterranean climate with mild wet winters and hot dry summers. South Australia's main temperature range is 29°C in January to 15°C in July. Most of the rain in the southern districts falls during winter when the sub-tropical high-pressure belt is displaced to the north over the continent.

The Great South Australian Coastal Upwelling System is Australia's only deep-reaching coastal upwelling system, bringing nutrient-rich water up from depths exceeding 300 m. It is a seasonal system which extends from Ceduna in the eastern Great Australian Bight, to Portland in Victoria, a distance of about 800 km. The upwelling events usually occur in summer, from December to April, driven by southeasterly coastal winds.

Major upwelling occurs along the southern tip of the Eyre Peninsula, and less pronounced upwelling off the south-western coast of Kangaroo Island.

There are several coastal marine weather forecast areas in South Australia:

  • Far west coast
  • Upper west coast
  • Lower west coast
  • Central coast
  • Spencer gulf
  • Investigator strait
  • Gulf st Vincent
  • Adelaide metropolitan waters
  • South central coast
  • Upper south east coast
  • Lower south east coast

Marine weather forecasts available from:

Marine ecology[edit]

The coastal waters are classified as temperate, and have a corresponding ecology, which includes a significant number of endemic species of interest to the recreational diver.

The nutrient-rich water from the upwelling has an important role in the life cycle of juvenile southern bluefin tuna which aggregate and feed on pilchards in the eastern Bight during the upwelling season. Colonies of sea lions, little penguins and seals, and the locally high abundance of blue whales and sharks are supported by the upwelling system.

The Great South Australian Coastal Upwelling System and its ecosystem can be regarded as one of Australia's natural wonders.


Dive sites[edit]

Gulf St Vincent east coast (including Adelaide)[edit]

Map showing the positions of dive sites on the east coast of the Gulf St Vincent

Top of Gulf St Vincent (S-34°133',E138°086') to North of Sellicks Beach (S35°20').

Marine weather forecast areas
  • Gulf St Vincent
  • Adelaide metropolitan waters
Dive sites include
  • John Robb: S 34°49.434', E 138°20.190'
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 20m. Remains of a ship that sunk in 1910.
  • Norma: S 34°49.397', E 138°25.044'
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 14m. Remains of a 4-masted iron barque which sank whilst at anchor after being rammed by another vessel in 1907.
  • Grange Tyre Reef: S 34°54'54.87", E 138°24'4.93"
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 18m. Artificial reef created in the early 1980s from tetrahedron modules made of used car tyres and ballasted with concrete.
  • Broken Bottom: S 34°57.773', E 138°28.822'.
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 10m. Remains of an old shore line which consists of a series of naturally formed rock piles spread over a large area.
  • Leather Jacket Alley: S 34°58.163', E 138°28.832'
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 10m. Remains of an old shore line which consists of a series of naturally formed rock piles spread over a large area. The dive site consists of a series of naturally formed gutters in the seabed.
  • Glenelg Blocks:
Reef dive. Boat access or swim from shore. Maximum depth 6 m. The site consists of a row of concrete boxes (or blocks) running parallel to the coastline. These are the remains of a mooring system and can be seen at low tide.
  • Glenelg Dredge: S 34°58'43.11", E 138°26'26.41"
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 20m. Former SA government suction dredge, South Australian, sunk in 1985 as an artificial for recreational diving and fishing.
  • Glenelg Barge: S 34°58'43.83" E 138°26' 27.85"
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 20m. Former SA government sand hopper barge sunk in 1984 as an artificial for recreational diving and fishing.
  • Glenelg Tyre Reef: S 34°58'54.63", E 138°26'40.81"
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 18m. Artificial reef made of tyre modules.
  • Claris: S 35°00.250', E 138°21.089'
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 28m. 12m long wreck
  • Mac’s Ground: S 34°58.550', E 138°27.084'
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 17m. Reef which is part of an old shore line rising a 1 m above the seabed and 150 m long running in an east west direction.
  • Milkies Reef: S 34°59.189', E 138°27.241'.
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 17m. Named after the occupation of the diver who discovered the site.
  • Somerton Reef: S 34°59'184", E 138°29'266"
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 6m.
  • Seacliffe Reef: S 35°02.264', E 138°29.440'.
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 15m. The site which is part of an old shore line consists of a reef running in north south direction and that stands about 1m above a sandy seabed.
  • Hallett Cove:
Reef dive. Access from shore or by boat. Maximum depth 8m. The site is a reefy area immediately adjoining the north point of the cove.
  • Port Stanvac Barges:
Saurian S 35°06.982', E 138°24.544'
Stanvac Barge 1: S 35°06.945', E 138°34.637'
Stanvac Barge 2: S 35°06.979', E 138°24.597'
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 28m. The site consists of 3 barges sunk in 1954 to form an artificial reef on a sandy bottom.
  • Stanvac Dump: S 35°06.210', E 138°28.117'
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 13m. A large artificial reef created on a rocky seabed.
  • Horseshoe Reef:
Reef dive. Boat access. Maximum depth 6m Rocky reef surrounded by sand This site is located with the boundaries of the Port Noarlunga Aquatic Reserve.
  • Port Noarlunga Reef: S 35.149298°, E 138.464297°.
Reef dive. Shore and boat access. Maximum depth 20m. Large site consisting of a 1.6 km long reef which is exposed at low tide and connected by a jetty to the shore 200m away. This site is located with the boundaries of the Port Noarlunga Aquatic Reserve. Parking in the street near the jetty. Public toilet and changing rooms in building to the south of the jetty, which also contains a restaurant. Fresh water shower near the shore end of the jetty.
The inshore side of the reef is well sheltered from swell, and the outside is much more exposed. Shore access is usually by the jetty, which has a staircase leading to the water just inshore of the reef. Access to the offshore side of the reef involves climbing over the reef or swimming around the ends. It is also possible to enter or exit from the beach.
Topography: Long straight fairly flat topped reef, much like a collapsed wharf with the blocks pushed into the sea on each side, leaving a fairly flat topped reef which dries by about half a metre. At least 100m long in each direction from the end of the jetty, and with another section in line beyond a gap to the south. Inshore very protected against swell, but gets a bit of current, particularly from waves coming over the reef at high tide. Offshore side of the reef near the jetty is a jumble of big blocky boulders like a breakwater. Sand bottom at about 9m. Lots of gaps and overhangs, crevices etc. of 1 to 2m depth and length.
Ecology: Sparse kelp and other weeds, crustose corallines and sponges, fair variety of invertebrates.
  • H.A. Lumb: S 35°08.059', E 138°26.439'
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 20m. Steel tug sunk as an artificial reef for recreational diving in 1994 by the Dive Industry Association of SA.
  • Sea Wolf: S 35°08.886', E 138°26.533'
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 20m. Fishing trawler sunk as an artificial reef for recreational diving in 2002 by the Seawolves Dive Club.
  • Port Noarlunga Tyre Reef: S 35°08'48.64", E 138°26'35.06"
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 18m. Artificial reef made of tyre modules.
  • Seaford Reef:
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 18m.
  • Gull Rock:
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 8m.
  • Star of Greece: S 35°15'8.6" E 138°27'33.7"
Wreck dive. Access from shore or from boat. Maximum depth 6m. Remains of a 3 masted iron ship which run aground during a storm in 1888.
  • Aldinga Aquatic Reserve:
Reef dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 18m Site consists of a sub-littoral reef with a 10m wall that drops to 18m (known as the ‘drop off’).

Fleurieu Peninsula[edit]

Map showing locations of recreational dive sites of the Fleurieu Peninsula
Map of the recreational dive sites at Rapid Bay, South Australia
Diver with leafy sea dragon at Rapid Bay jetty
Map showing the dive sites of Victor Harbor in South Australia

South of Sellicks Beach (S 35°20'), west of Murray River mouth (E 138°53' )

Marine weather forecast areas
  • Investigator strait
  • South Central coast
Dive sites include
  • Myponga Beach: S 35°22.346', E 138°23.066'
  • Carrickalinga Beach: S 35°25.511', E 138°19.233'
  • Second Valley headland: S 35°30.624', E 138°13.000'
Shore entry from rocky headland beyond probable old whaling station site. Iron post at tip of headland. Alternative entry and exit at south side of headland in sheltered cove. Both places require some walking over rocky ridges. Maximum depth about 9m at sand bottom. Parking at the end of the access road, with public toilets and changing room. No potable water.
Topography: Fairly steeply sloping rocky reef at end of small rocky promontory south of the river mouth. Sand bottom at about 9m, shallower on south side of the point. Sedimentary rock, in places heavily folded, looks metamorphosed to some degree – quite hard and resistant to weathering. Probably shale or mudstone originally. Dip fairly steep, about 25 degrees, Strike about north/south by estimate. Total width of reef slope not very large, The sand and the shoreline can be seen from most places on the 5m contour. Widest part of the reef is about 30 or 40m, and narrowest nearer 15 to 20m.
Ecology: Mixed kelp and other seaweeds, moderate density, substrate visible through the weed a fair amount of the time.
  • Lasseter’s Reef: S 35.50838°, E 138.21873°
Reef dive. Shore access from the beach at Second Valley, or by boat. Maximum depth about 8m on sand bottom, top of reef about 3m.
Topography: Low outcrop of limestone on sand bottom surrounded by seagrass beds, Reef approximately circular, about 50m across. The offshore side has higher profile structure and more fish will usually be seen there. The limestone as usual is riddled with small holes and crevices like a sponge.
Ecology: Heavy growth of mixed kelp and other seaweeds. May be slightly silted, so visibility reduces locally when disturbed.
Jetty dive. Shore or boat entry. Maximum depth about 12m at eastern end of tee. Usual entry is by staircase at the end of the new jetty. There is parking at the end of the access road near the new jetty, but the nearest toilet facilities are at the caravan park which is several hundred metres away.
Topography: Disused jetty with combination of wood and steel columns. Rubble and detritus from jetty on bottom between piles, with occasional sand patches. The old jetty is in structural disrepair and has partially collapsed. there is a T jetty with multiple pile dolphins at the end of the main jetty. A row of stakes in the sand bottom between the entry point at the seaward end of the new jetty has been provided to guide divers across the gap. Lots of structural detritus and handrails are strewn around the bottom under the eastern arm of the tee.
Ecology: Columns are heavily covered with sponges ascidians and bryozoans, except where exposed to direct sunlight, where it is covered by seaweeds. Bottom gravel patches with scallops, sand with seagrass and rubble with seaweed and sessile invertebrates. Dense seagrass on sand except under shaded cover of jetty. Moderate fish diversity and numbers. There are usually more fish near the T in the area known as the cathedral than along the main section of the jetty. This site is famous for leafy sea dragons, but they seem to be less common than in the past. Weedy sea dragons are also seen occasionally. Giant cuttlefish and bobtails may also be seen. Large numbers of fish congregate in the cathedral.
Wreck dive. Boat access only. Maximum depth 30m. The former HMAS Hobart, a decommissioned Adams class guided missile destroyer, was sunk in late 2002 in Yankalilla Bay (100 km south of Adelaide) to create an artificial reef for recreational diving. It is a requirement that all people obtain a permit before entering the protected area established around the site. Permits are free and last for one year.
  • AV Ulonga
  • Morgan’s Beach
  • Hopper Barge No. 3 Wreck
  • Fishery Beach
  • Blowhole Beach, recommended to have 4x4 vehicle.
  • Deep Creek
  • West Island
  • The Bluff (i.e. Rosetta Head) & Chamber’s Beach
  • Wright Island
  • The Whale Bone
  • Seal Island
  • Granite Island

Limestone Coast[edit]

Map showing the locations of recreational dive sites of the Limestone coast

From the Murray River mouth (E 138°53') east to Victoria state border (E 141°00')

Marine weather forecast areas
  • Upper south east coast
  • Lower south east coast

While it does have some well-regarded ocean coast sites, the Limestone Coast (formerly the South East) of South Australia is probably best known for its freshwater sinkhole and cave sites.

Ocean sites[edit]

Dive sites include
  • Kingston Jetty
  • Margaret Brock Reef
  • Robe
  • Stinky Bay
  • Beachport Jetty
  • Carpenter Rocks
  • Port McDonnell

Freshwater sites[edit]

Diving in Piccaninnie Ponds

While cave diving certification is required for most freshwater sites, entry level scuba divers can dive in Ewens Ponds and snorkellers can dive in Piccaninnie Ponds

  • Ewens Ponds - A permit is required to snorkel and dive at Ewens Ponds. Permits are issued to individuals on an annual or a single basis. You must purchase a permit and book your dive or snorkel sessions before arriving at the park. Time slots are one hour long, with a maximum of two dives or snorkel sessions per person, per day. You must be out of the water before your time slot expires. Adult: $15.00 Annual adult: $59.00 Concession: $13.00 Annual concession: $47.00 Child: $10.00 Annual child: $36.00
  • Piccaninnie Ponds - Piccaninnie Ponds Conservation Park is a 543-ha protected area in south-eastern South Australia. It adjoins Discovery Bay on South Australia’s Limestone Coast. Piccaninnie Ponds contains three main features of interest to divers. The ‘First Pond’ is an open depression about 10 m deep with a silt floor and much aquatic life, the ‘Chasm’ is a sinkhole with a depth of over 100 m, and the ‘Cathedral’ is an enclosed area with limestone formations and a depth of about 35 m. Underwater visibility is excellent and may exceed 40 m. A permit is required to snorkel and dive at Piccaninnie Ponds. Permits are issued to individuals on an annual or a single basis. You must purchase a permit and book your dive or snorkel sessions before arriving at the park. Time slots are one hour long, with a maximum of two dives or snorkel sessions per person, per day. You must be out of the water before your time slot expires. Adult: $40.50 Annual permit: $83.50

Cave diving sites[edit]

Most cave diving sites require divers to have qualifications issued by the Cave Divers Association of Australia (CDAA). The CDAA offers training to 3 levels - Deep Cavern (the entry level grade), Cave & Advanced Cave. The CDAA also will accept overseas cave diving qualifications subject to completion of orientations, knowledge/skill assessments and in some cases, additional training. Divers interested in obtaining CDAA qualifications, should be aware that the following entry requirement exists for the Deep Cavern course - Advanced Open Water qualification, entry level diver qualification held for at least 12 months, minimum experience of 25 dives (post Advanced Open Water) including at least two night dives and five dives deeper than 25 metres (minimum total of 20 hours), be 18 years of age or older and be medically fit to dive.

The sites are located within the following local government areas (listed by minimum cave diving grade). Within the cave diving community, the following areas are just known as the Mount Gambier Region.

The City of Mount Gambier:

  • Cave - Engelbrechts Cave East
  • Advanced Cave - Engelbrechts Cave West.

District Council of Grant:

  • Deep Cavern - Blacks Hole, Ela Elap, Gouldens Hole, Hells Hole, Horse & Cart, Kilsby's Sinkhole, Little Blue Lake, McKay's Shaft, One Tree, Piccaninnie Ponds, Tea Tree, Ten Eighty, The Shaft and The Sisters.
  • Cave - Allendale Sinkhole, Baker's Cave, Dave's Cave and Max's Hole.
  • Advanced Cave - Hann's Cave.

Wattle Range Council:

  • Cave - Fossil Cave, Mud Hole
  • Advanced Cave - Nettlebed, Iddlebiddy, Stinging Nettle Cave, Tank Cave, and Three Sisters Cave.
  • Cave/Advanced Cave - The Pines.

Kangaroo Island[edit]

Map of the recreational dive sites at Kangaroo Island
Marine weather forecast areas
  • Central coast
  • Investigator strait
  • South central coast
Dive sites include
  • Penneshaw Jetty
  • Snapper Point
  • Vivonne Bay
  • Portland Maru
  • Western River Cove
  • Stokes Bay
  • Emu Bay

Yorke Peninsula[edit]

Map showing the location of recreational dive sites on the Yorke Peninsula

South of Port Broughton (S 33°35'), top of Gulf St Vincent (S-34°133',E138°086').

Marine weather forecast areas
  • Spencer gulf
  • Central coast
  • Investigator strait
  • Gulf St Vincent
Dive sites include
  • Ardrossan Town Jetty
  • Ardrossan
  • Zanoni
  • Ardrossan barge
  • Stansbury Jetty
  • Klein’s Point Jetty
  • Wool Bay Jetty - Grassy bottom, quite shallow 4 - 5m deep.
  • Port Giles Jetty - Flinders Ports has signage at the start of the jetty saying they do not permit diving this jetty.
  • Edithburgh Jetty: 35°5.0865'S,137°44.918'E
  • Troubridge Point
  • Clan Ranald
  • Williyama
  • Stenhouse Bay Jetty - Sandy bottom, 10m depth, overturned Ford Telstar at the end of the jetty, lots sea grass either side of the jetty.
  • Hougomont - Wreck lies approx 200m south of Stenhouse Bay Jetty, wreck is mostly collapsed with the aft and masts the only things really still standing, two large chains run seaward away from the wreck which assists in locating it.
  • Chinaman’s Hat Island - Inter tidal reef lies either side of the island in alignment with the coastline, once navigated over (approx 200m surface swim) drops off to approx 10m deep with canyons, swim throughs, caves on the seaward side of the island, requires entry into Innes National Park which has entry fees.
  • Haystack Island
  • Seal Island
  • Althorpes Islands
  • Pondalowie Bay
  • Point Turton
  • Port Victoria
  • Wardang Island, also known as Wauraltee Island, is a low-lying island in the Spencer Gulf close to the western coast of the Yorke Peninsula. The waters around Wardang are popular with recreational divers because of the opportunities for wreck diving. A dive trail showcases eight of nine shipwrecks around the island, which are associated with the trading port of Port Victoria in the early 1900s. Of the wrecks, five are of schooners and coastal steamers that carried wheat and other local cargo – Monarch, Australian, Investigator, MacIntyre and Moorara, and three were larger vessels that transported grain to Europe – Aagot, Notre Dame D’Arvor and Songvaar.
  • Port Hughes Jetty
  • Moonta Bay Jetty
  • Wallaroo Jetty - 10m deep, sandy bottom, kelpy on pylons, access over rocky beach or by descending jetty ladders.
  • Port Broughton Jetty

Upper Spencer Gulf[edit]

Map showing locations of recreational dive sites of the north Spencer Gulf,

North of Port Broughton (S33°35') on the east coast and Victoria Point at Franklin Harbour (S 33°43.576') on the west coast.

Marine weather forecast area
  • Spencer gulf
Dive sites include
  • Port Germein Jetty
  • Whyalla

Every year, between the months of May and August, large groups of Giant Cuttlefish (Sepia apama) gather at sites near the regional city of Whyalla (235 km NW of Adelaide) to mate. More info here.

  • Point Lowly
  • Stony Point
  • Black Point

Eyre Peninsula[edit]

Map showing locations of recreational dive sites on the Eyre Peninsula

From the Western Australia border (E 129°00') to Victoria Point at Franklin Harbour in the Spencer Gulf (E 136°59.355').

Marine weather forecast areas
  • Far west coast
  • Upper west coast
  • Lower west coast
  • Central coast
  • Spencer gulf
Dive sites include

The only destination for shark cage diving in Australia. Boat access only. Depth relatively shallow — the cages are moored at the surface while one tour operator is permitted to lower cages to the seabed. Other fish may be attracted to baits where these are used. Cage dives are only available from three licensed tour operators.

  • Avoid Bay
  • Coffin Bay
  • Baird Bay
  • Elliston
  • Streaky Bay
  • Ceduna

Respect[edit]

Fishing[edit]

Spearfishing is not permitted when using scuba and other breathing apparatus and also is not permitted at particular locations such as within 100 m of jetties.

Restrictions apply to the capture of the following invertebrate species by recreational scuba divers such as size, bag and boat limits, and closed areas: Rock Lobster (Jasus edwardsii), Abalone (Haliotis spp) and Scallop (Family Pectinidae).

A class of protected areas known as Aquatic reserves may have specific limits or restrictions on what a recreational scuba diver can take.

Get help[edit]

In case of emergency[edit]

Caution Note: Emergency retrieval and treatment services in Australia are not entirely free. All users of a retrieval service (i.e. ambulance) are required to pay if they do not have a subscription while only Australian citizens and some classes of visa holders are entitled to free treatment in a public hospital. Refer Scuba diving in Australia#Emergency treatment for more information.

Triple zero telephone service[edit]

The Triple Zero (000) telephone number is the principal means used in Australia of seeking emergency assistance from police, ambulance and fire services. Use Triple Zero only if someone seriously injured or in need of urgent medical help, if your life or property is being threatened or you have just witnessed a serious accident or crime. Triple Zero calls are free.

DES hotline[edit]

The Divers Emergency Service (DES) is a 24 hour emergency service operating in Australia. It can be reached on 1800 088 200 (free call within Australia) or on +61 8 8212 9242. Contact this number if you have any medical concerns after diving including advice for the first aid of an injured diver. Dive physicians are available 24 hours a day. Calls to DES are answered in the South Australian Ambulance Service call centre. If you are phoning from within South Australia, you may be asked if you require an ambulance.

Sea rescue[edit]

For divers who either own or travel on boats other than those used for charter services, there are two volunteer services operating in South Australia that may be of use in case of an emergency- these are the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard and the South Australian Sea Rescue Squadron. In case of an emergency, use one of the following radio bands to make contact with either organisation - VHF channels 16, 67 and 80, 27MHZ channel 88 and MF/HF.

Non-emergency matters[edit]

Police.[edit]

Use 000 for emergencies (refer above). Use 131 444 to contact the South Australian Police for 'non-urgent' police assistance such as asking a question or seeking advice, reporting a missing person or lost property, making a complaint, making general police related enquiry or reporting a crime which does not require a statement such as a house breaking, illegal use of a vehicle, property damage or theft. Calls to 131 444 are charged at a standard rate.

Recompression chamber[edit]

Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, tel +61 8 8222 5116

Find out[edit]

Get service[edit]

Learn[edit]

See Services directory for contact details.

Dive schools[edit]

  • Adelaide Scuba
  • Ben's Scuba Diving School
  • DecoStop Diving Services
  • Dive and Sea Adelaide
  • DiveEssentials
  • Divers Service
  • Diving Adelaide
  • Elite Diving Academy
  • NB Scuba
  • Snorkel Safari Adelaide
  • Underwater Sports Diving Centre

Buy[edit]

See Services directory for contact details.

Dive shops[edit]

The retail dealers specialising in diving equipment are listed. Other sporting goods stores may also supply a limited range of diving equipment.

Scuba cylinder fills[edit]

The listed dealers will fill cylinders for the general public. Some other service providers will fill for members only or for their own students or charter customers. See directory for more details.

  • Adelaide Scuba
  • Allendale East General Store (Allendale East, south of Mount Gambier)
  • All Pressure Testing
  • Divers Delight
  • Divers Service
  • Diving Adelaide
  • Edithburgh Motors (Edithburgh)
  • Elite Diving Academy
  • Kangaroo Island Dive and Adventure
  • Scuba Commercial
  • South Coast Abrasive Blasting (Victor Harbor)
  • Underwater Sports Diving Centre
  • Whyalla Diving Services

Rent[edit]

The listed dealers will rent scuba equipment to qualified divers. Some other service providers rent scuba equipment to qualified divers who are members or for their own students or charter customers. See directory for more details.

  • Adelaide Scuba
  • Divers Delight
  • Divers Service
  • Diving Adelaide
  • Elite Diving Academy
  • Kangaroo Island Dive and Adventure
  • Underwater Sports Diving Centre

Do[edit]

See Services directory for contact details.

Boat dive charters[edit]

The retail dealers offering boat dive charters are listed. Other charter operators such as those offering fishing charters may also supply boat dive charters.

  • Adelaide Scuba
  • Divers Service
  • Snorkel Safari Adelaide
  • Underwater Sports Diving Centre

Guided shore dives[edit]

Leafy Seadragon Tours[edit]
  • Adelaide Scuba
  • DecoStop Diving Services
  • Diving Adelaide
  • Divers Service
  • Downunderpix
  • Elite Diving Academy
  • Kangaroo Island Dive and Adventure
  • NB Scuba
  • Snorkel Safari Adelaide
  • Underwater Sports Diving Centre

Shark cage diving[edit]

Three operators are licensed by the South Australian Government to conduct shark cage diving at the Neptune Islands, about 70 km south of Port Lincoln. The best times for viewing at the Neptune Islands are considered to be May to October followed by the seal breeding season during November to February, although sightings are possible all year round. At least 2 other businesses - Mike Ball Dive Expeditions and Goin’ Off Safaris, resell trips on behalf of the 3 license holders. 2 operators offer day trips while the third offers multiple day trips. All 3 operators offer surface cage dives using surface-supplied air while one also offers cage dives on the seabed using scuba.

  • Calypso Star Charters
  • Rodney Fox Shark Expeditions
  • Shark Cage Diving Pty Ltd (a joint venture between Adventure Bay Charters and McMahon Industries) which trades under Adventure Bay Charters’ name.

Dive clubs[edit]

Places where divers gather, have a drink and discuss diving. Some clubs also may offer training and equipment rental and air fills to members. Only dive clubs not exclusively affiliated to a dive school or dive shop are listed here. Some clubs welcome visitors to club dive outings, but non-members will usually have to provide their own equipment.

  • Adelaide Scuba Diving Club
  • Adelaide University Scuba Club
  • British Sub Aqua Club Adelaide Inc
  • Coastal Waters Dive Club
  • Flinders University Underwater Club
  • Marine Life Society of South Australia
  • Mildura Desert Divers Club
  • Noarlunga Aquatic Recreational Club for Divers
  • Sea Wolves Dive Club
  • Southern Ocean Diving Society
  • Underwater Explorers Club of SA

Fix[edit]

See Services directory for contact details.

Scuba equipment servicing and repair[edit]

  • Adelaide Scuba
  • Divers Delight
  • Divers Service
  • Diving Adelaide
  • Scuba Commercial
  • Scuba Clinic
  • Snorkel Safari Adelaide
  • Underwater Sports Diving Centre

Scuba cylinder inspection and testing[edit]

  • All Pressure Testing
  • Divers Service
  • Diving Adelaide
  • National Hydro Cylinder Testing Services
  • Scuba Commercial
  • Underwater Sports Diving Centre

Dry suit servicing and repair[edit]

These services are not available in South Australia. All of this work is usually carried out by service providers based in Melbourne or elsewhere.

Wet suit repairs and custom fitting[edit]

  • Wetsuit Coolers

Service details[edit]

Get around[edit]

South Australian cities, towns, settlements and road network

Stay safe[edit]

See[edit]

Marine life[edit]

Shipwrecks and artificial reefs[edit]

Read[edit]

General dive guides[edit]

  • Christopher, Peter, (1988), Divers Guide to South Australia (ISBN 0958804400)
  • Scapens, W., Port Noarlunga; a complete guide to Port Noarlunga, NautiGuides
  • Scapens, W., Whyalla’s Cuttlefish: a guide for all visitors to Whyalla, NautiGuides
  • Scapens, W., Yorke Peninsula, NautiGuides

Shipwrecks guides[edit]

Shipwreck and maritime archaeology references[edit]

  • Coroneos, Cosmos; (1997), Shipwrecks of Encounter Bay and Backstairs Passage, South Australian Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources & Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology & Australian National Centre of Excellence for Maritime Archaeology, Adelaide, South Australia (ISBN 0958849625) (ISBN 9780958849623) OCLC:39288190
  • Coroneos, Cosmos & McKinnon, Robert; (1997), Shipwrecks of the Investigator Strait and the Lower Yorke Peninsula, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Adelaide, South Australia. (ISBN 0958849633) OCLC:40044611.
  • McKinnon, R.; (1993), Shipwreck sites of Kangaroo Island, State Heritage Branch, Department of Environment and Land Management. Adelaide (ISBN 0730826929).
  • Moody, Stuart M.; (2012), Port Victoria's ships and shipwrecks, S. M. Moody, Maitland, South Australia, (ISBN 9780987322814)(hbk.),(ISBN 9780987322807) (pbk.) OCLC:793599689.

Marine Life & Natural History[edit]

Cave diving[edit]

  • Lewis, Ian and Stace, Peter, (1982), Cave diving in Australia, Revised ed., Ian Lewis & Peter Stace, Adelaide SA (ISBN 0959496300) OCLC: 44997569

Safety guidance[edit]

This dive guide to Diving in South Australia is a usable article. It has information on location and equipment as well as some complete entries on what to see. An adventurous person could use this article, but please feel free to improve it by editing the page.