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Ilocano, (Iloco) or (Iluko) is the main language of the Northern Philippines. According to the 2005 Census, there are about 8 million people who speak Ilocano as a mother tongue (locally called kabakketan a dildila) and still another 2 million who speak it as a second language. Although it has no official status in the country, those who use it often call it the National Language of the North. From their traditional homeland (the Ilocandia), Ilocanos have migrated southward, now forming large communities in Central Luzon, Metropolitan Manila and even in the main Urban centres of General Santos City and Zamboanga City in the Island of Mindanao.

There are also a sizable number of Ilocano speakers in the United States, especially in Hawaii, California, Alaska and Washington, as the Ilocanos were the first Filipinos to migrate en masse to the US. Speakers of this language are also found in Canada, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom and Australia.

Belonging to the Austronesian family of languages, it is related to all the other languages in the Philippines like the larger Tagalog and Cebuano. It is also distantly related to Malagasy, Malay, Tetum, Hawaiian and other Polynesian languages.

Grammar[edit]

Ilocano is an agglutinative language. Meaning, it employs a number of affixes to signify changes in meaning. If you are having a hard time looking for a word in the dictionary, try dropping the following suffixes:

--ak or -k
I or my
--tayo
we or our
--mo
you or your (singular)
--yo
you or your (plural)
--na
his, her or its
--da
their
--en or -n
already

As adjectives may be placed at either sides of the noun, one must not forget the ligature nga (if the next word begins with a vowel) or a (if the next word begins with a consonant) to establish the connection.

Sample: yellow dress may be rendered as bado a duyaw or duyaw a bado.

Pronunciation guide[edit]

Like all its sister languages, Ilocano is fairly easy to pronounce. The general rule is one sound for each letter. However, the language, like all the Borneo-Philippine Languages, employ the digraph ng to represent an initial velar nasal consonant (the ng in English sing).

Accents are very unpredictable and must be learnt while learning the new word. Although books about the language will show these signs, they are often not found in publications like newspapers.

Vowels[edit]

The Ilocano language has either five or six vowels, depending on what dialect you choose to speak. The language is generally divided into the Amianan (Northern) and Abagatan (Southern) Dialects. The only difference however between these two dialects is the way they pronounce the letter 'E'. In the Abagatan Dialect, only five vowels are present and they are pronounced as follows:

a
open front unrounded vowel IPA [a]; like the a in father
e
open-mid front unrounded vowel IPA [ɛ]; like the e in bed
i
close front unrounded vowel IPA [i]; like the ea in beat
o
close-mid back rounded vowel IPA [o]; like the au in author
u
close back rounded vowel IPA [u]; like the oo in boot

On the other hand, the Amianan Dialect has another vowel for the symbol 'e'. For the speakers of the Abagatan Dialect, the 'e' that was given above is used for words of foreign origin (e.g. elepante from Spanish). For native words, the sound of a close back unrounded vowel is used. There is no equivalent for this sound in English so some dictionaries use the IPA symbol for the schwa sign. But the proper symbol must be:

e
close back unrounded vowel IPA [ɯ]; like the ao in the Scots Gaelic caol.

Historically, Ilocano has only 3 vowels and this reality is still evident until today as the sounds of e and i and o and u' often merges.

When the letter i precedes another letter, its sound will glide resulting to the sound of [j]. This happens also to the letter u where it glides into the sound of [w].

Spanish cities such as Vigan were in contact with Spanish, hence, the additional open-mid front unrounded vowel "e".

Consonants[edit]

b
like the English bed
c
like the k in sky not as in kite
d
like the d in the Japanese dojo
f
(in proper nouns only) like the English feather
g
like the English go
g
(in foreign words from Spanish only) like the English house
h
like the English house
j
(in foreign words from Spanish only) like the English house
k
like the k in sky not as in kite
l
like the l in London
m
like the m in mother
n
like the n in nanny
p
like the p in spot not as in pot
qu
like the k in sky not as in kite
r
like the r in right
r
(in foreign words from Spanish only) like the r in rojo
s
like the s in seven
t
like the d in the Chinese Dao De Jing
v
like the English bed
v
(in proper nouns only) like the v in vase
w
like the w in water
x
(in proper nouns only) like the x in six
x
(in proper nouns only) like the x in the Spanish Mexico
y
like the y in yam
z
like the s in seven
z
like the z in zebra

Some consonants change their sounds when followed by a vowel. The following sounds are produced:

di
like the j in jack
si
like the sh in shampoo
ti
like the ch in church

As mentioned above the digraph ng represents the sound of the same digraph in Singer. However, unlike in English, this sound may be used as initial.

The initial glottal stop is not written. Thus, it appears as if the word commences with a vowel. When it occurs at the middle of the word, a hypen (-) is inserted to represent the sound.

Common diphthongs[edit]

There are only three commonly used diphthongs in the Ilocano language. They are as follows:

ay
like the i in high
iw
like the iw in Tiw
oy
like the oy in boy

Other diphthongs are also likely to occur but they are generally from loaned words. They are usually pronounced as they are foreign.

Phrase list[edit]

Basics[edit]

Common signs


OPEN
nakalukat (nah-kah-loo-KAHT)
CLOSED
nakarikep (nah-kah-ree-KEHP)
ENTRANCE
pagunegan (pah-GOO-nah-GAHN)
EXIT
paruaran (pah-RWAH-rahn)
PUSH
iduron (ee-doo-RAWN)
PULL
guyuden (goo-YOO-duhn)
TOILET
banio (BAHN-yaw)
MEN
lallaki (lahll-LAH-kee)
WOMEN
babbai (bahb-BAH-ee)
FORBIDDEN
maipawil (mah-ee-PAH-weell)
Hello.
(There is actually no equivalent for this greeting. Instead, Ilocanos tend to greet in terms of time or by asking how are you.)
How are you?
Kumusta ka? (koo-mooss-tah KAH?)
Fine, thank you.
Naimbag nak met, agyamanak! (nah-eem-BAHG nahck muht, ahg-yah-mah-NAHCK)
What is your name?
Ania ti naganmo? (ahn-YAHT nah-gahn-MAW?)
My name is ______ .
Siak ni ______. (SHAHCK nee _____ )
Nice to meet you.
Naragsakak a maam-ammoka. (nah-rahg-SAH-kahk ah mah-ahm-ahm-moo-KAH)
Please.
Pangngaasi . (pahng-ngah-AH-see' )
Thank you.
Agyamanak. (ahg-YAH-mah-NAHCK)
You're welcome.
Awan ti anyaman na. (ah-WAHN tahn-YAH-mahn nah)
Take care
Agaluad ka. (ah-gahll-WAHD kah)
Yes.
wen. (wuhn)
No.
saan. (sah-AHN)
Excuse me. (getting attention)
Pakawanennak. (pah-kah-wah-NEHN-nahck) [also Excuse me. (Ilocanos don't usually use the native term anymore.)]
Excuse me. (begging pardon)
Dispensar. (deess-pehn-SAHR)
I'm sorry.
Dispensaren nak (deess-PEHN-sah-REHN nahck)
Goodbye
Agpakadaakon. (ahg-pah-kah-dah-AH-kawn)
Goodbye (informal)
Kasta pay. (kahss-tah-PIGH)
I can't speak Ilocano.
Diak agsasao ti Ilocano. (jahck ahg-sah-sah-AW tee ee-law-KAH-naw)
I can't speak Ilocano well.
Diak unay amo agsao iti Ilocano. (jahck oo-NIGH ah-MAW ahg-sah-AW ee-TEE ee-law-KAH-naw)
Do you speak English?
Agsasao ka iti Inggles? (ahg-sah-sah-AW kah ee-TEE eeng-LEHSS?)
Is there someone here who speaks English?
Adda kadi tattao nga agsasao ti Inggles? (ahd-DAH kah-DEE taht-tah-AW ngah ahg-sah-sah-AW tee eeng-LEHSS?)
Help!
Tulong! (TOO-lawng)
Look out!
Agan-nad ka! (ah-gahn-NAHD kah!)
Good morning.
Naimbag a bigat. (nah-eem-BAHG ah bee-GAHT)
Good afternoon
Naimbag a malem. (nah-eem-BAHG ah mah-LEHM)
Good evening.
Naimbag a rabii. (nah-eem-BAHG ah rah-bee-EE)
Good night.
Naimbag a rabii. (Note: Ilocano has actually no equivalent words to express this sentence.)
I don't understand.
Diak maawatan. (jahck mah-ah-WAH-tahn)
Where is the toilet?
Ayan-na ti banio? (ah-YAHN nah tee bahn-NYAW)

Problems[edit]

Leave me alone.
Ibatidak! (ee-bah-TEE-dahck!)
Don't touch me.
Dinak ig-igaman. (dee-NAHCK eeg-ee-GAH-mahn)
I'll call the police!
Agayabak ti pulis! (ah-gah-YAH-bahck tee poo-LEESS!)
Stop! Thief!
Esardeng! Agtatakaw! (eh-sahr-DEHNG! ahg-tah-TAH-kow!)
I need your help.
Masapulko ti tulong mo. (mah-SAH-pooll-KAW tee TOO-lawng maw) (or when talking to many people: Masapulko ti tulong yo!) (mah-SAH-pooll-KAW tee TOO-lawng yaw!)
I am lost.
Napukawak! (nah-poo-KAH-wahck!)
I lost my bag.
Mapukaw ti bag ko. (mah-POO-kow tee bahg kaw)
I lost my wallet.
Mapukaw ti petakak. (mah-poo-KOW tee peh-TAH-kahck)
I am sick.
agsakitak (ahg-sah-KEE-tahck)
I met an accident.
Naaksidente ak! (nah-ahck-see-DEHN-teh ahck!)
I need a doctor.
Masapulko ti doktor. (mah-SAH-pooll-KAW tee dawck-TAWR)

Numbers[edit]

There exist two names for the numbers in Ilocano. The native Ilocano and the Spanish names. Generally, Ilocanos use the Spanish terms if they are talking about time of very large quantities. You will however see the native terms if you would read literary books. If you are going on a shopping, prices of small values are given in this form.

1
maysa (migh-SAH)
2
dua (dwah)
3
tallo (tahll-LAW)
4
uppat (oop-PAHT)
5
lima (lee-MAH)
6
innem (ihn-NEHM)
7
pito (pee-TAW)
8
walo (wah-LAW)
9
siam (shahm)
10
sangapulo (sah-ngah-POO-law)
11
sangapulo ket maysa (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht )
12
sangapulo ket dua (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht dwah)
13
sangapulo ket tallo (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht tahll-LAW)
14
sangapulo ket uppat (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht oop-PAHT)
15
sangapulo ket lima (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht lee-MAH)
16
sangapulo ket innem (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht ihn-NEHam)
17
sangapulo ket pito (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht pee-TAW)
18
sangapulo ket walo (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht wah-LAW)
19
sangapulo ket siam (sah-ngah-POO-law kuht shahm)
20
duapulo (dwah-POO-law)
21
duapulo ket maisa (dwah-POO-law kuht migh-SAH)
22
duapulo ket dua (dwah-POO-law kuht dwah)
23
duapulo ket tallo (dwah-POO-law kuht tahll-LAW)
30
tallopulo (tahll-law-POO-law)
40
uppat a pulo (oop-PAHT ah-POO-law)
50
limapulo (lee-mah-POO-law)
60
innem a pulo (ihn-NEHM ah-POO-law)
70
pitopulo (pee-taw-POO-law)
80
walo a pulo (wah-law ah-POO-law)
90
siam a pulo (shahm ah-POO-law)
100
sangagasut (sah-ngah-gah-SOOT)
200
duagasut (dwah-gah-SOOT)
300
tallogasut (tahll-law-gah-SOOT)
1,000
sangaribu (sah-ngah-ree-BOO)
2,000
duaribu (dwah-REE-boo)
1,000,000
sangariwriw (sah-ngah-reew-REEW)
1,000,000,000
sangabillion (sah-ngah-beell-YAWN)
1,000,000,000,000
sangatrillion (sah-ngah-treell-YAWN)
number _____ (train, bus, etc.)
numero iti tren/bus (NOO-meh-raw ee-TEE trehn/booss)
half
gudua (goo-DWAH)
less
bassit (bahss-SIHT)
more
adu (ah-DOO)

Time[edit]

now
tatta (taht-TAH)
later
madamdama (mah-dahm-dah-MAH)
before
sakbay (sahck-BIGH)
morning
bigat (bee-GAHT)
afternoon
malem (mah-LEHM)
evening
rabii (rah-bee-EE)
night
rabii (rah-bee-EE)

Clock Time[edit]

one o'clock AM
a la una iti bigat (ah lah OO-nah ee-TEE bee-gaht)
two o'clock AM
a las dos iti bigat (ah lahss dawss ee-TEE bee-GAHT)
noon
tengnga ti aldaw (teh-NGAHT ahll-DOW)
one o'clock PM
a la una iti malem (ah lah OO-nah ee-TEE mah-LEHM)
two o'clock PM
a las dos iti malem (ah lahss ee-TEE mah-LEHM)
midnight
tengnga ti rabii (tehng-NGAHT rah-bee-EE)

Duration[edit]

____ second(s)
____ segundo (seh-GOON-daw)
____ minute(s)
____ minuto (mee-NOO-taw)
____ hour(s)
____ oras (AW-rahss)
____ day(s)
____ aldaw (ahll-DOW)
____ week(s)
____ lawas (LOW-wahss)
____ month(s)
____ bulan (BOO-lahn)
____ year(s)
____ tawen (TOW-wuhn)

Days[edit]

today
ita nga aldaw (ee-TAH ngah ahll-DOW)
yesterday
idi kalman (ee-DEE kahll-MAHN)
tomorrow
inton bigat (ihn-TAWN bee-GAHT)
this week
maudi a lawas (mah-oo-DEE ah LOW-wahss)
last week
ita a lawas (ee-TAH ah LOW-wahss)
next week
intono umay a lawas (ihn-TAW-naw oo-MIGH ah low-WAHSS)


Sunday
Domingo (daw-MEENG-gaw)
Monday
Lunes (LOO-nehss)
Tuesday
Martes (mahr-TEHSS)
Wednesday
Mierkoles (MYEHR-kaw-lehss)
Thursday
Juebes (hoo-WEH-behss)
Friday
Biernes (BYEHR-nehss)
Saturday
Sabado (SAH-bah-daw)

Months[edit]

January
Enero (eh-NEH-raw)
February
Febrero (pehb-REH-raw)
March
Marso (mahr-SAW)
April
Abril (ahb-REELL)
May
Mayo (MIGH-yaw)
June
Hunio (HOON-nyaw)
July
Hulio (HOOLL-yaw)
August
Agosto (ah-GAWSS-taw)
September
Setiembre (seht-YEHM-breh)
October
Oktubre (awck-TOO-breh)
November
Nobiembre (nawb-YEHM-breh)
December
Disiembre (deess-YEHM-breh)

Writing time and date[edit]

Dates can be written as follows:

  • English format: March 7, 1983 would be Marso 7, 1983
  • Spanish format: March 7, 1983 would be maika-7 iti Marso, 1983

Times are written as in English (as in 2:23AM) but spoken in Spanish (as in a las says baynte tres iti bigat).

Colors[edit]

blue
asul (ah-SOOLL)
red
baga (BAH-gah)
yellow
duyaw (doo-YOW)
green
berde (BEHR-deh)
orange
kahel (kah-HEHLL)
black
nangisit (nah-NGEE-seet)
white
puraw (poo-ROW)
brown
kayumanggi (kah-yoo-mahng-GEE)
grey
dapo (DAH-paw)

Transportation[edit]

Tricycles and Jeepneys[edit]

How much is the fare to name of the place?
Manu ti plete inggana idiay name of the place? (Literally: How much to the name of the place.)
How many people can take a ride?
Manu nga tao ti mabalin nga sumakay? (MAH-noo ngah TAH-aw tee mah-bah-LEEN ngah soo-mah-KIGH?)
Stop!
Para! (This is used only for modes of transportation and never for people.)

Bus and Train[edit]

How much is a ticket to _____?
Sagmamano ti tiket a mapan ______? (sahg-mah-MAH-naw tee TEE-keht ah MAH-pahn ____?)
One ticket to _____, please. Maysa man a tiket a mapan _____. (MIGH-sah mahn ah TEE-keht ah MAH-pahn ____)
Where does this train/bus go?
Sadino ti papanan daytoy a tren/bus? (sah-DEE-naw tee pah-PAH-nahn digh-TAWY ah trehn/booss?)
Where is the train/bus to _____?
Sadino ti tren/bus a mapan _____? (sah-DEE-naw tee trehn/booss ah MAH-pahn ____?)
Does this train/bus stop in _____?
Agsardeng kasi daytoy a tren/bus idiay _____? (ahg-SAHR-duhng kah-SEE digh-TAWY ah trehn/booss ee-JIGH ____?)
When does the train/bus for _____ leave?
Kaano nga agrubuat ti tren/bus a mapan _____? (kah-AH-naw ngah ahg-ROO-bwaht tee trehn/booss ah MAH-pahn ____?)
When will this train/bus arrive in _____?
Kaano a sumangpet daytoy a tren/bus idiay ______? (kah-AH-naw ah soo-MAHNG-puht digh-TAWY ah trehn/booss ee-JIGH ____?)

Directions[edit]

How do I go to ____?
Kasano ti mapan idiay ____? (kah-SAH-naw tee MAH-pahn ee-JIGH ____?)
... the train station
...estasion ti tren (ehss-tahss-YAWN tee trehn)
... the bus station
... estasion ti bus (ehss-tahss-YAWN tee booss)
... the airport
... ti pagpatayabán (tee pahg-pah-tah-yah-BAHN)
... downtown
... ili (EE-lee)
... the American/Australian/British/Canadian Consulate
...tee konsulado ti Amerika/Australia/Britania/Canada) (...kawn-soo-LAH-daw tee ah-MEH-ree-kah/owss-TRAHLL-yah/bree-TAHN-yah/KAH-nah-dah) [note: There is actually no Embassy or Consulate in the Ilocandia as almost all of them are in Metro Manila.]
Where are there a lot of _____?
Ayanna nga lugar ti adu ti _____? (ah-yahn-NAH ngah loo-GAHR tee ah-DOO tee ____?)
... the ___ hotel
...iti ___ hotel (ee-TEE ____ haw-TEHLL)
... restaurants
... restaurant (note: When visitng the Philippines, a foreigner might want to eat at the Philippine cafetiria called carinderia.)
... bars
... bars (bahrss)
... sights to see
... mabuya (mah-BOO-yah)
Can you show me in the map?
Mabalin nga pakitam kaniak ayanna idiay mapa? (mah-BAH-leen ngah pah-KEE-tahm kahn-YAHCK ah-YAHN-nah ee-dee-YIGH MAH-pah?)
street
dalan (DAH-lahn)
You turn left.
Kumannigidka. (koo-MAHN-nee-GEED-kah)
You turn right.
Kumannawanka. (koo-MAHN-now-WAHN-kah)
left
kannigid (kahn-nee-GEED)
right
kannawan (kahn-nah-WAHN)
straight ahead.
Dumiretso (doo-mee-REHT-saw)
towards the____
mapan iti ___ (mah-PAHN ee-TEE ___)
past the ____
kalpasan iti ____ (kahll-PAH-sahn ee-TEE ___)
before the ____
sakbay iti ____ (sahck-BIGH ee-TEE ___)
intersection
Rotonda
north
amianan (ahm-YAH-nahn)
east
daya (DAH-yah)
south
abagatan (ah-bah-gah-TAHN)
west
laud (LAH-ood)
uphill
pasang-at (pah-SAHNG-aht)
downhill
pasalog (pah-SAH-lawg)

Lodging[edit]

Do you have an available room?
Adda pay ti kuarto yo? (ahd-DAH pigh tee kwahr-TAW yaw?)
How much is a single room?
Manu ti kwarto para maysa nga tao?
How much is a room for two/three people?
Manu ti kuarto para dua/ tallo nga tao? (MAH-noo tee kwahr-TAW PAH-rah dwah/TAHLL-law ngah TAH-aw?)
Is a __________ included in the room?
Adda ti __________ idiay kwarto? (ahd-DAH tee _____ ee-JIGH kwahr-TAW?)
blanket
ules (oo-LEHSS)
bathroom
banio (BAHN-yaw)
telephone
telepono (teh-LEH-paw-naw)
television
telebisyon (or simply TV) (teh-leh-beess-YAWN)
May I see the room?
Mabalin nga makitak diay kwarto? (mah-BAH-leen ngah mah-KEE-tahck dee-YIGH KWAHR-taw)
Do you have any room that is more quiet?
Adda ti kwartoyo nga naul-ulimek?
bigger
dakdakkel (dahck-dah-KEHLL)
cleaner
nadaldalus (nah-dahll-dah-LOOSS)
cheaper
nalaklaka (nah-lahck-lah-KAH)
I'll stay for one/ two nights.
Agyanak ti maysa/dua nga rabii. (ahg-YAH-nahck tee migh-SAH/dwah ngah rah-bee-EE)
Can you suggest another place?
Adda ammum nga sabali nga lugar?
Do you have a safe?
Adda ti safe? (ahd-DAH tee sayf?)
Do you have a locker?
Adda ti lockeryo? (ahd-DAH tee LAH-kehr-yaw?)
Please clean my room.
Dalusam man 'toy kuartok. (dah-LOO-sahm mahn toy kwahr-KAWCK)
Can you wake me up at ____?
Mabalin nga riingen nak ti ___? (mah-bah-LEEN ngah ree-ee-NGEHN nahck tee ____?)
I am going to check out.
Ag-check-outak. (ahg-chehck-OWT-tahck)

Money[edit]

Do you accept American Dollars?
Ag-alakayo ti dolar nga Amerikano? (ahg-ah-lah-kah-YAW tee DAW-lahr ngah ah-meh-ree-KAH-naw?)
How much is a dollar here?
Manu ti maysa a dollar idtoy? (MAH-noo tee migh-SAH eed-TOY?)
Do you accept credit cards?
Ag-alakayo ti credit card? (ah-lah-kah-YAW tee KREH-diht kahrd?)
Is there an ATM here?
Adda ti ATM idtoy? (ahd-DAH tee ay-TEE-ehm eed-TOY?)

Eating[edit]

A table for one/ two person, please.
Maysa man a mesa para maysa/dua a tao. (migh-SAH mahn ah MEH-sah PAH-rah migh-SAH/dwah ah TAH-aw)
Can I see the menu?
Mabalin a makitak ti menu? (mah-bah-LEEN ah mah-KEE-tahck tee meh-NOO?)
What is the your specialty?
Ania ti specialty-yo? (ahn-YAHT ehss-PEH-shahll-tee-YAW?)
I am vegetarian.
Vegetarianak. (beh-jeh-TAHR-yahn-NAHCK)
I don't eat pork.
Diak mangan ti karne ti baboy. (jahck MAH-ngahn tee kahr-NEHT BAH-boy)
I don't eat beef.
Diak mangan ti karne ti baka. (jahck MAH-ngahn tee kahr-NEHT BAH-kah)
chicken
karne ti manok (kahr-NEHT mah-NAWCK)
pork
karne ti baboy (kahr-NEHT BAH-boy)
beef
karne ti baka (kahr-NEHT BAH-kah)
It's salty.
Nagapgad (nah-gahp-GAHD)
It's so sweet.
Nagsam-it (nahg-SAHM-iht)
It's spicy.
Naggasang (nahg-GAH-sahng)
It's sour.
Nagalsem (nah-gahll-SUHM)
breakfast
pamigat (pah-mee-GAHT)
lunch
pangaldaw (pah-ngahll-DOW)
snack
mirienda (mih-RYEHN-dah)
supper
pangrabii (pahng-rah-bee-EE)
fish
ikan (ee-KAHN)
ham
ham (hahm)
sausage
longganisa (lawng-gah-NEE-sah)
cheese
keso (KEH-saw)
egg
itlog (iht-LAWG)
salad
salad (SAH-lahd)
vegetables
nateng (nah-TUHNG)
fruits
prutas (PROO-tahss)
bread
tinapay (tee-NAH-pigh)
noodles
pancit (pahn-SEET)
rice
innapoy (ihn-nah-POY)
May I have a glass of water please.
Maysa man a baso ti danom. (migh-SAH mahn ah BAH-saw tee DAH-nawm)
It was delicious.
Naimas (nah-EE-mahss)
I'm finished/done.
Nalpasakon (nahll-PAH-sah-KAWN)

Bars[edit]

Do have you wine/liqueur?
Adda ti arakyo? (ahd-DAH tee ah-rahck-YAW?)
One/ Two bottle/s of beer, please.
Maysa/Dua man a bote ti beer. (migh-SAH/dwah mahn ah BAW-teh tee beer)
whiskey
whiskey (WEESS-kee)
vodka
vodka (BAWD-kah)
rum
ram (RAHM)
water
danom (DAH-nawm)
food
makan (mah-KAHN)
coffee
kape (kah-PEH)
milk
gatas (GAH-tahss)
chocolate
tsokolate (chaw-kaw-LAH-teh)
Another one, please.
Maysa pay, please. (migh-SAH pigh, pleess)
What time do you close?
Ania ti oras nga agrikepkayo? (ah-NYAH tee AW-rahss ngah ahg-ree-kehp-kah-YAW?)

Shopping[edit]

Do you have something bigger/ smaller?
Adda dakdakkel/ basbassit? (ahd-DAH dahck-dah-KUHLL/bahss-bah-SIHT?)
expensive
nangina (nah-NGEE-nah)
cheap
nalaka (nah-LAH-kah)
I don't wan't it.
Diak kayat. (jahck KAH-yaht)
I'll take it.
Alaekon. (ah-LAH-eh-kawn)
I need _____ .
Masapulko ti _____. (mah-SAH-pooll-KAW tee _____)
...toothpaste
... toothpaste (TOOTH-payst)
...toothbrush
...sepilyo (seh-PEELL-yaw)
...condom
...kondom (KAWN-dawm)
...sanitary napkin
...napkin (NAHP-keen)
...soap
... sabon (sah-BAWN)
...shampoo
... siampo (SHAHM-paw)
...pain reliever. (e.g., aspirin or ibuprofen)
...pangep-ep iti ut-ot (...pah-nguhp-uhp ee-TEE oot-OOT)
...cold medicine.
....agas ti panateng (...ah-GAHSS tee pah-NAH-tuhng)
...stomach medicine.
...agas ti sakit iti buksit (...ah-GAHSS tee sah-KEET ee-TEE boock-SEET)
...razor
... pagibarbas (pah-gee-BAHR-bahss)
...umbrella
... payong (PAH-yawng)
...post card
... post card (pawst kahrd)
...stamps
... selyo para iti surat
...battery
... bateria (bah-tehr-YAH)
...paper
... papel (pah-PEHLL)
...pen
... bolpen (BAWLL-pehn)
...English Book
... libro nga Inggles (leeb-RAW ngah eeng-LEHSS)
...English Magazine
...magasin nga Inggles (MAH-gah-seen ngah eeng-LEHSS)
...English Newspaper
...diario nga Inggles (JAHR-yaw ngah eeng-LEHSS)
...English-Ilocano Dictionary
...diksionario nga Inggles-Ilokano (deeck-shaw-NAHR-yaw ngah eeng-LEHSS-ee-law-KAW-naw)

Driving[edit]

I want to rent a car.
Kayatko nga agrenta ti kotse. (kah-YAHT-kaw ngah ahg-REHN-tah tee KAWT-seh)
Can I get an insurance?
Mabalin nga ag-ala-ak ti insurance? (mah-bah-LEEN ngah ahg-ah-LAH-ahck tee een-SHOO-ranss?)
Stop!
Sardeng! (sahr-DEHNG!)
gasoline
gasolina (gah-saw-LEE-nah)
diesel
krudo (KROO-daw)
gasoline station
paggasolinaan (pahg-gah-saw-lee-nah-AHN)

Note: As Ilocano enjoys no official status in the Philippines, no street sign is written in the language. Street signs and even public notices are posted in English.

Authority[edit]

I haven't done anything wrong.
Awan iti madi nga inaramidko. (ah-WAHN ee-TEE mah-DEE ngah ih-nah-rah-MEED-kaw)
It was a misunderstanding.
Maysa laeng daydiay a di panagkinkinnaawatan. (migh-SAH LAH-uhng ah dee pah-nahg-kihn-kihn-nah-ah-WAH-tahn)
Where are you taking me?
Sadinno ti pangipanam kaniak? (sah-DEE-nawt pah-NGEE-pah-nahm kahn-YAHCK?)
Am I under arrest?
Kemmegennak kadi? (kuhm-muh-guhn-NAHCK kah-DEE?)
Where's the warrant?
Ayan ti warrant? (ah-YAHN tee WAHR-rahnt?)
I am an American/Australian/British/Canadian citizen.
Siak ket umili ti Amerika/Australia/Britania/Kanada. (shahck kuht oo-MEE-lee tee ah-MEH-ree-kah/owss-TRAHLL-yah/bree-TAHN-yah/KAH-nah-dah)
I want to talk to the American/Australian/British/Canadian embassy/consulate.
Kayatko ti makipatang iti embahada/konsulado ti Amerika , Australia,Britanya,Kanada. (kah-yaht-KAW tee mah-kee-pah-TAHNG ee-TEE ehm-bah-HAH-dah/kawn-soo-LAH-daw tee ah-MEH-ree-kah/owss-TRAHLL-yah/bree-TAHN-yah/KAH-nah-dah)
I want to talk to my lawyer.
Kayatko a makasarita ti abogadok. (kah-yaht-KAW ah mah-kah-sah-REE-tah tee ah-baw-GAH-dawck)
Can I just pay a fine, now.
Mabalinak kadi nga agbayad ti multa itan? (mah-bah-lee-NAHCK kah-DEE ngah ahg-BAH-yahd tee mooll-tah EE-tahn?)


This Ilocano phrasebook is a usable article. It explains pronunciation and the bare essentials of travel communication. An adventurous person could use this article, but please feel free to improve it by editing the page.