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II am going to Baku City Azerbaijan , and I am a American need to know what Vaccinations that I need[edit]

Thank you for your time

Asked by: Yncing1939 (talk) 18:08, 8 July 2017 (UTC)

I think Azerbaijan#Stay_healthy answers your question quite well. ϒpsilon (talk) 18:24, 8 July 2017 (UTC)
I'd say Hep A & B and tetanus shots are essential anywhere in Asia, but you really need to see your doctor and/or a travel medicine specialist.
US government advice is here. Pashley (talk) 18:30, 8 July 2017 (UTC)
As a US citizen, the CDC web site is dedicated to provide up to date information on exactly this: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/traveler/none/azerbaijan --Andrewssi2 (talk) 22:56, 8 July 2017 (UTC)
Look whether there is a specialist for travel medicine near where you live. Failing that, your noal docotr should either know that themself or be able to point you in the right direction. Hobbitschuster (talk) 11:24, 9 July 2017 (UTC)

Fishing trip to Kautokeino - Karasjok in northern Norway[edit]

I and my father are going on a fishing trip to northern Norway, specifically to the Kautokeino - Karasjok area near the border to Finland, in middle August. We would need some advice on where to actually head there.

We are both interested in hiking among the nature and fishing. (Well, my father likes fishing more than I do.) We are quite experienced travelers, my father has traveled to Lapland for almost half a century and I for almost two decades. But we don't have much experience about Norway.

We will be bringing our own car, it's a Volkswagen Touran. It seats both of us comfortably in the front and the back will be filled with our stuff. We will have comfortable and durable outdoor clothing, hiking shoes and rubber boots. We will be fishing on rivers, not in the sea. We both have fishing rods with reels and my father has a good selection of lures.

Our intention is to avoid extremely long and taxing hikes through the nature just to reach the river. The idea is to fish in the middle of the night, when the fish can't see our shadows in the river. We have two options:

  • Bring our own tent so we can spend the night by the river and leave back to camp the next morning, or
  • Just make a short trip to the river so we can go back to our car and drive back to camp late at night, and then sleep at the camp.

A suitable total hiking distance per day would be about 3 to 8 km. Much more than 8 km on a single day would exhaust us.

We would also need advice on where to actually reside. We would need some sort of fishermen's camping area with camping huts and possibility to cook our own food. We will be bringing our own sleeping bags so we don't need hotel-quality bedding.

Does anyone have any idea on what options for this are available in the Kautokeino - Karasjok area? And do we need Norwegian fishing permits, and if so, where can we get them and how much do they cost?

Asked by: JIP (talk) 19:20, 17 July 2017 (UTC)

What we have on that region is at Finnmark or in articles linked from there. Pashley (talk) 23:53, 17 July 2017 (UTC)
Fishing tourism is quite big in the area, so getting local advice should not be difficult. You do need permits, possibly different permits depending on area (so changing locations may involve paying double fees). There may be one common permit covering most of the area in question, I do not know, and I do not know prices. You have to disinfect your equipment, including boots, when moving between waters that may have the salmon plague and waters that do not have it (I hope there is none on Finnmarksvidda, but there is in many Finnish rivers), and you may need a certificate on the treatment (thorough drying suffices, I do not know how this is handled).
There are rivers close to roads (both Karasjoki and Kautokeino river, to name the main ones – I do not know how the Alta power plant downstream affects fish in the Kautokeino river), so how much hiking to do is probably a question on how far from roads you want to do the fishing and any specific preferences. I do not know your car, generous ground clearance widens the selection of places in reach by car, but there should be quite some selection of huts/cabins regardless.
I have not been fishing in the area, and have not used cabins there, so cannot give any specific advice. Sorry for that. I suppose calling the tourist offices (or the municipal administration) would give you pointers. Norwegians in general speak good English and the local Norwegian is quite close to Swedish. For a geographic overview you could use the tourism association (DNT) service ut.no and the kartverket maps. The former also describes hikes and cabins on the way, but mostly gives the confusing "no accommodation" (if noted at all) for ordinary cabins, which have to be booked. Our Karasjok and Kautokeino articles are not too well developed, but might provide some help (expanding them would be appreciated).
--LPfi (talk) 06:54, 19 July 2017 (UTC)

DC driving[edit]

Do I understand rightly that the Capital Beltway, around Washington DC, is toll-free if you don't drive in the special HOV-only lanes, at least on weekends? The warning signs upon approaching from the southeast (I-66) have made me hesitate to take the Beltway (I'm rather firmly a shunpiker), but w:en:Interstate 495 (Capital Beltway) makes it sound like the normal lanes are free. Nyttend (talk) 12:04, 19 July 2017 (UTC)

I can't answer your toll question, but are you planning on driving into DC or do you intend to only use the Capital Beltway without going into DC itself? Because all I have heard about DC driving is that it is neither fun nor cheap and the Metro is most likely to be faster than driving anyway. That said, maybe User:Ikan Kekek as an East Coast native knows the answer? Hobbitschuster (talk) 12:23, 19 July 2017 (UTC)
Heading into DC itself; at some point, I expect to be going to the southern tip of DC (my interest is architectural photography), and taking the Beltway past Alexandria would be preferable to driving through downtown and the Mall area, if I don't have to pay tolls. I've driven, parked in, and walked around downtown on two Saturdays this month (it's immensely cheaper, and presumably vastly easier, than doing the same during the week), so I'm not particularly concerned about doing it a third time. Nyttend (talk) 17:17, 19 July 2017 (UTC)
It's been a couple of years since I drove there, but indeed, the Beltway was free except for HOV lanes where they exist (in northern Virginia). --Xuxl (talk) 18:12, 19 July 2017 (UTC)
I have no idea, as I neither drive nor have I been to DC since 2000. However, DC is notorious for being a bad place to drive, and it's a good walking city with decent public transit coverage. Ikan Kekek (talk) 05:51, 21 July 2017 (UTC)

What to do if my ÖBB RailJet train is cancelled?[edit]

I'm going to the World Bodypainting Festival on the last weekend of July. What worries me is how I'll get back home from there.

I've booked an ÖBB RailJet train on the morning of Monday 31 July from Klagenfurt at 09:39 to Vienna at 13:35. My flight back home to Finland leaves Vienna Airport at 19:20 in the evening. So if everything goes well, I'll have plenty of time to get there.

But what if everything doesn't go well? What if the train gets cancelled? Currently the ÖBB track information site doesn't show any planned interruptions or cancellations for RailJet trains between Vienna and Klagenfurt, but that doesn't mean something can't still come up.

If I don't reach Vienna by 18:00 in the evening, I'll miss my flight. I'll have to spend another night at a hotel and book another flight to Finland. This will cost me at least 600 € extra, which I'm hoping to avoid.

I am ready to allow for the train to be delayed up to 3 hours, I can still reach my flight then. If there's another train, I can buy a ticket to there. However, I have a Sparschien ticket, which isn't transferable. Can I still use the ticket on the new train if the intended train was cancelled?

But if all the trains get cancelled, I'm stuck in Klagenfurt. Eventually I'll die there if I can't get out in a few days.

Will ÖBB be providing replacement buses from Klagenfurt to Vienna, or at least somewhere along the route, if the train gets cancelled? Judging by what I've found on the Internet, they usually do, but not always. Sometimes they just leave passengers stranded.

And if I miss my flight, can I just go to Vienna Airport and book another flight there at a sales counter, or will I have to phone home and ask someone to do it for me online? If the flight only leaves the next morning, can I spend the night at the airport or do I have to book a hotel room?

I have e-mailed ÖBB about this question but they haven't answered. Asked by: JIP (talk) 18:58, 20 July 2017 (UTC)

There is such a thing about worrying too much. There are regular trains between Klagenfurt and Vienna, with a departure every two hours and a trip taking a little over 3:45. Getting from downtown Vienna to the airport is a breeze. You have plenty of time to make it to your flight even if by some incredible piece of bad luck your train was cancelled for no reason. These are two major cities, and would not be left without rail connection for an extended period. The Austrian railroad is very reliable and punctual and is not known for stranding passengers. But if you are stranded, Vienna is only a four-hour drive away from Klagenfurt and there is regular bus service to Vienna via WESTbus [1]. So you're unlikely to die there, fortunately. Finally, you can usually buy tickets at the airport in the very unlikely eventuality you were to miss your flight. Have a nice trip. --Xuxl (talk) 19:30, 20 July 2017 (UTC)
The WESTbus service only provides two connections: One at 07:30 in the morning, which is before my train leaves, and another one which only arrives at Vienna after 18:30, meaning I will have no time to catch my flight. But if it were happen for me to depend on WESTbus, I could try to spend the night either in Klagenfurt or in Vienna. But I would still need a new flight. JIP (talk) 21:22, 20 July 2017 (UTC)
Unfortunately Flixbus is no alternative, either as they bunch their departures to be five minutes ahead of Westbus - oh the joys of capitalist competition! Hobbitschuster (talk) 22:19, 20 July 2017 (UTC)
Yeah I also think you should be fine. If ÖBB has to cancel the trains, they will likely offer some form of alternative transportation for their customers (and even if it takes hours more, you'd still be fine) and if some event were to befall Austria that shuts down all rail lines and all roads between Vienna and Klagenfurt for a day, I think missing your plane would be one of your lesser concerns. Do enjoy yourself and have a safe trip! Hobbitschuster (talk) 19:54, 20 July 2017 (UTC)

Judging by http://www.zugfinder.de, the train RJ 534 I'm going back from Klagenfurt to Vienna only stays at Klagenfurt for two minutes. That means I have all of two minutes from the train arriving at the station to get on board. If I don't manage it, I'm stuck in Klagenfurt. And what's more, it will be my own fault, not ÖBB's, which means that any possible further expenses to get back to Finland will be paid by me, not by ÖBB or my insurance company. Only a few seconds' delay on getting on board the train could cost me almost 1000 € extra plus loss of income on the next day.

Still, I did the same trip last year, only the festival was in Pörtschach, not in Klagenfurt. I left back home on the same train, and judging by the timetable, it only stayed in Pörtschach for one minute. I still managed to get aboard the train.

Will ÖBB trains wait for all passengers on the platform to come aboard or will they depart punctually on schedule, regardless of passengers? JIP (talk) 23:45, 22 July 2017 (UTC)

I don't understand, what takes so long in getting on a train? You know which platform it is arriving at, right? And you'll be at the platform before the train arrives, right? So you just wait for the doors to open (or you push the button) and you get on. That takes all of a few seconds. If you need to find your seat, you can walk around in the train as well. Hobbitschuster (talk) 18:50, 23 July 2017 (UTC)
No offense, but I think you have traveled on trains before? Stations all over the world have information billboards or screens, in visible locations, saying at which track the next trains arrive and depart. Be at the station at least 10-15 minutes before the train should be there according to the schedule. Read on the billboard/screen at which track your train will arrive, go to that platform, wait for the train and enter it. As a side note, trains rarely if ever wait for passengers.
You travel between two major cities in a western country. In the unlikely event that the train will be canceled or delayed the train company will definitely inform the passengers, if needed arrange alternative transport for you and the other passengers going to Vienna.
As well, in the worst case you can probably travel by taxi from Klagenfurt to Vienna airport; given that you will be at a railway station there are probably taxis right outside. Not cheap, but probably much cheaper than having to buy new flight tickets, accommodation etc. and definitely much less hassle. Have a nice trip. ϒpsilon (talk) 19:33, 23 July 2017 (UTC)
I took a test today about my time to get on board a train. I got on a local train at Leppävaara railway station in Espoo and recorded the exact time. I sat on a bench until the doors opened, and then got on board the train. It took 18 seconds.
However, that was at a time when the train and the platform were relatively empty. In Austria, I'm travelling back home after the World Bodypainting Festival. Thousands of other people are also travelling back home after the festival. There might be huge queues at the station.
I understand the train cannot wait for everyone who has a ticket to get on board. They don't even know everyone who has a ticket. But if there's people queuing right at the door to get on board, can the train simply close the door right in front of someone's nose? JIP (talk) 22:45, 23 July 2017 (UTC)
Unlike airplanes trains do not wait for people showing up late. But if you are on the platform in time, you will be on the train. Trains do not shut the doors and depart while people are still boarding. Like someone said before, you worry a bit too much. Have a nice trip. :) Jahoe (talk) 09:07, 24 July 2017 (UTC)
I have never seen a long distance train platform sufficiently crowded for it to impede safe and speedy boarding. On metros and light rail, sure. But not on long distance trains. True, that experience is mostly from Germany, but Railjet and ICE are targeted to similar demos in similar places. That said, the earlier you are on the platform, the less can get in the way. If you have a seat reservation, there should also be some overview where the car with your seat is supposed to stop (at least they have that in Germany). If you fear the train to be crowded, get a seat reservation; they are available separately from a ticket and should cost single digit Euros. Have a look here Hobbitschuster (talk) 11:49, 24 July 2017 (UTC)

arriving in DC with a rental car[edit]

We want to drive to Washington DC with a rental car, coming from Pittsburgh on a Friday afternoon. We don't need the car for the rest of the trip, so we want to return it in DC as soon as possible. We will be staying close to Dupont Circle. What is the best place to return the car? Is it a good idea to return it somewhere close to the hotel or should we rather return it at some place out of town (Dulles Airport maybe)?

Thanks! Asked by: 192.53.103.119 09:50, 24 July 2017 (UTC)