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North America > United States of America > Midwest > Illinois > Chicagoland > Northwest Suburbs (Illinois) > Arlington Heights

Arlington Heights

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The food court at Mitsuwa Marketplace

Arlington Heights is a city in northeastern Chicagoland. A 2003 Census put the population at 76,031, the largest for a village in the United States. Arlington Heights is known for the Arlington Park Race Track as well as a large Japanese community, third in the state behind neighboring Schaumburg and Chicago proper. Some notable people have come from the Village as well, including Walter Payton, Ted Nugent, and Ray Kroc (founder of McDonald's).

Get in[edit]

By car[edit]

Interstate 90 (The Jane Addams Memorial Tollway) serves as the fastest way into and out of Arlington heights, and makes up the southern border of the city. This is also the fastest way to and from Chicago and O'Hare International Airport. Illinois 53 makes up another thoroughfare on the westside, and leaving south on that expressway will eventually lead you to Interstate 290 (an alternate route to downtown Chicago) and Interstate 355 (towards Joliet). Other major arteries include U.S. 12 (Rand Road), U.S. 14 (Northwest Highway), Illinois 62 (Algonquin Road), and Illinois 68 (Dundee Road).

By train[edit]

Arlington Heights is served by two stations on Metra's Union Pacific Northwest Line: Arlington Heights and Arlington Park. Frequent service (as well as some express trains) between 6:40am and 1:15am during the week, with less frequent service on weekends, can allow for a side trip to Chicago or any other suburb on the line. No service to Arlington Heights is provided by Amtrak or the CTA.

By bus[edit]

Pace bus is the sole provider of bus service of any kind in Arlington Heights. Routes 594, 606, 616, 690, and 696 make up all of the routes that are within city limits. Routes 594 and 696 have stops at the Arlington Heights Metra station, making connections to and from the train possible. no buses stop at the Arlington Park station, however, route 696 does stop at the actual race track. Bus intervals are infrequent, and you should plan to spend an extra hour or two at least in bus transit times. Route 594 is a dial a ride service for Arlington Heights and Rolling Meadows, and vehicles are timed to meet Metra trains. No intercity buses stop in Arlington Heights.

Get around[edit]

By car[edit]

Like most of the suburbs, driving is the easiest way to get around. Interstate 90 (The Jane Addams Memorial Tollway) serves as the fastest way into and out of Arlington heights, and makes up the southern border of the city. This is also the fastest way to and from Chicago and O'Hare International Airport. Illinois 53 makes up another thoroughfare on the westside, and leaving south on that expressway will eventually lead you to Interstate 290 (an alternate route to downtown Chicago) and Interstate 355 (towards Joliet). Other major arteries include U.S. 12 (Rand Road), U.S. 14 (Northwest Highway), Illinois 62 (Algonquin Road), and Illinois 68 (Dundee Road).

By train[edit]

Arlington Heights is served by two stations on Metra's Union Pacific Northwest Line, however trying to use the train as a means of transportation may not work out to your benefit, unless your destination is Arlington Park. The train does not reach most areas, due to the size of the village

By bus[edit]

Pace bus is the sole provider of bus service of any kind in Arlington Heights. Routes 594, 606, 616, 690, and 696 make up all of the routes that are within city limits. All of these routes extend beyond Arlington heights, so trying to get from suburb to suburb, or say, Woodfield mall, is made easier by using these regional routes. Tying to move around Arlington Heights is more difficult, as no routes reach further north than the Arlington Heights Metra station.

See[edit]

  • Arlington Park, 2200 W. Euclid Ave.. One of the premier horse-racing tracks in the Midwest, Arlington Park has been in operation since 1929. It's the home of the Arlington Million, a Breeders' Club qualifying bet. Nowadays the Park seems to attract a mixture of regular bettors, day-trippers, and beginners, with a special betting window for beginners plus a tutorial on its website.

Do[edit]

  • Metropolis Performing Arts Center, 111 W. Campbell St.. One block from the Arlington Heights Metra stop, this 350-seat theater is part of a larger village development called the Metropolis. Besides the theater you'll find a club called The Boiler Room, shops, and apartments.
  • Janus Theater. Affiliated with the Arlington Heights Park District, this venue stages summer outdoor productions throughout the northwest suburbs.
  • Karaoke, 224 E. Golf Rd. At the Korean-owned Ding Dong Dang, karaoke the Asian way with your own personal booth. Don't worry about other patrons hearing your sad attempt at Bohemian Rhapsody, just your friends. Surprisingly cheap, although if you order any of the Korean food or alcohol the tab will start to add up.

Buy[edit]

  • Mitsuwa Marketplace. This enormous Japanese mall is the center of the Japanese community in the northwest suburbs. There's a large Japanese supermarket, bakery, food court, liquor store, bookstore, video rental store, and even real estate agency.

Eat[edit]

  • Sushi Station. One of the few locations in Chicagoland, this unique sushi restaurant is in the mechanical tradition of a 回転寿司 (rotating sushi) restaurant straight from Tokyo. It's technically in next-door Rolling Meadows.

Drink[edit]

  • Peggy Kinnane's Irish Restaurant and Pub, 8 N. Vail Ave.. With live music Friday and Saturday evenings, a prime downtown location, and a loyal clientele, Peggy Kinnane's is a step above other Chicagoland Irish pubs.

Sleep[edit]

Go next[edit]

  • Elgin, to the west, is a large city along the Fox River and a buffer town between Chicagoland and Northern Illinois. There's a casino downtown, a large park with museums, and beautiful Victorian homes.
  • Schaumburg, Arlington Height's sister village to the south, has the humongous Woodfield Mall, which for whatever reason is the most visited tourist attraction in Illinois.
  • Des Plaines is the home of the first McDonald's.
Routes through Arlington Heights
RockfordSchaumburg  W I-90.svg E  Des PlainesChicago
Lake GenevaFox Lake  W US 12.svg E  Mount ProspectChicago
HarvardBarrington  W US 14.svg E  Mount ProspectChicago
Ends at Illinois 83.svgLong Grove  N Illinois 53.svg S  SchaumburgJoliet
HarvardBarrington  NW Metra Union Pacific Northwest icon.png SE  Mount ProspectChicago


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