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Casa Grande is a city in South Central Arizona that is largely a commuter town for people working in Tuscon or Phoenix. It was the site of an interment camp for Japanese-Americans during World War II, and has played a prominent role in baseball in the United States.

Understand[edit]

Casa Grande is approximately halfway between Phoenix and Tucson of over 57,000 people (2018). It is named after the Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, which is located in Coolidge. "Casa Grande" is Spanish for "big house".

The economy of Casa Grande used to be based on rural, agricultural industries such as cotton and dairy farms. Over time, the city has become home to many Phoenix or Tucson urbanites who own homes in Casa Grande. Most residents either commute north to work in the Phoenix metropolitan area, or to the south, to work in Tucson.

Ehrmann Commonwealth Dairy operates a major dairy processing facility in the town that opened in 2013 and employs about 110 people.

History[edit]

Casa Grande was founded in 1879 by the Carter Family during the Arizona mining boom due to the presence of the Southern Pacific Railroad. Casa Grande grew slowly, and suffered several setbacks both in 1886 and 1893, when fires ravaged the town, destroying all wooden housing structures within it. When the mining boom slowed in the 1890s, the town was nearly abandoned, but with the advent of agriculture, the town remained alive and well. Casa Grande was home to a collective farm society which was part of the New Deal.

During World War II, from 1942 to 1945, a Japanese-American relocation camp was set up outside of Casa Grande, known as the Gila River War Relocation Center. Two notable people that were interned there were future actor Pat Morita and baseball player Kenichi Zenimura, who constructed a baseball field and set up a league in the relocation camp.

Casa Grande has played a prominent role in semi-pro and collegiate baseball. The Casa Grande Cotton Kings, who were founded in 1948, qualified to play in the National Baseball Congress World Series ten straight times by winning Arizona state championships in the 1940s and 1950s, and were reactivated in the 2000s. They are now members of the Pacific Southwest Baseball League.

Climate[edit]

Casa Grande has a hot desert climate, typical for the Sonoran Desert. The city experiences long, extremely hot summers and brief winters consisting of mild afternoons and chilly evenings. The area averages only 9.07 inches (230 millimeters) of rain per year. The coolest month on average is December, with highs averaging 68 °F (20 °C), and lows typically averaging around 37 °F (3 °C). TAlong with the rest of southern Arizona, the community is prone to dust storms and in the summer months is affected by the North American Monsoon, which brings high winds and heavy rain.

Get in[edit]

Casa Grande is located about halfway between Phoenix and Tucson and is accessible by automobile.

Get around[edit]

There is no public transportation, so a car is essential.

See[edit]

Casa Grande Valley Historical Society

Do[edit]

Eloy Municipal Airport, home to the world's largest skydive dropzone

Buy[edit]

  • 1 Outlets at Casa Grande, 2300 E Tanger Dr, +1 520-836-9663, toll-free: +1-800-405-5016. 22 brand-name stores, including Liz Claiborne, PacSun, Sears, Guess, Izod, OshKosh, and GNC.

Eat[edit]

Grocery stores[edit]

  • 6 Food City, 300 N Florence St, +1 480-963-0518. Daily 6AM-11PM.
  • 7 Fry's Food, 1385 E Florence Blvd, +1 520-836-1701. Daily 6AM-midnight. Has a full-service deli and on-site pharmacy.
  • 8 Safeway, N Trekell Rd, +1 520-421-7447. Daily 5AM-midnight. Has a full-service deli and on-site pharmacy.

Drink[edit]

Sleep[edit]

Connect[edit]

Go next[edit]

Routes through Casa Grande
YumaDateland ← Jct N Arizona 85.svg S  W I-8.svg E  Merges into I-10.svg
PhoenixChandler  W I-10.svg E  EloyTucson



This city travel guide to Casa Grande is a usable article. It has information on how to get there and on restaurants and hotels. An adventurous person could use this article, but please feel free to improve it by editing the page.