Wikivoyage:Discover

From Wikivoyage
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Here we collaborate on future discover facts that are featured on the Main Page (and on the Discover page).

Criteria

  • Keep it short and snappy: no more than twenty words, please.
  • At a minimum, [[link]] the article that contains the fact in question. The fact must be taken from a Wikivoyage article.
  • '''Boldface''' the fact of interest.
  • Linked articles don't need to be perfect, but preference should be given to those with a status of "usable" or higher.
  • Relevant images are required for one in every three facts. They should be placed above the fact in question, with the following formatting:
[[Image:imagename|right|100px|description]]
The interesting fact linked to this image goes here.
  • When looking for fun facts to add, Special:Random (also accessible in the left sidebar) which displays a random Wikivoyage article can be a useful tool. As many articles unfortunately are short on content, you may want to hit the link multiple times while opening up new articles in new tabs.

Now displayed


Matapa Chasm, Niue.jpg
  • Matapa Chasm (pictured) on Niue is next to the sea, but isolated from its currents by large boulders at the ocean side and the drumming noise from the ocean waves is quite a treat and can be deafening as you near its mouth.
  • Whilst not actually the burial place of ancient royalty, The Tombs of the Kings in Paphos is worthy of the name none the less.
  • Like its much larger neighbour Valencia and a number of other towns in the Valencian Community, Cullera celebrates Fallas with the construction and burning of falla monuments in the streets.


  • Updates are automatically handled by Template:Discover daily and each Discover entry is displayed for three days.
  • If the box above is empty, it means that the template ran out of entries. If this happens you can add new entries from the nominations below. Any entries that are added to the template should be removed from the nominations list.
  • If you are unsure about how it works, feel free to try out things in the Discover sandbox first.
  • When the entry's sojourn on the Main Page is over, it should not just be deleted from the template but also added to the Discover archive.

Nominations

Add your entries to the end of this list. Do not leave any space or other commentary between entries. However, feel free to rearrange the list, because geographic variety in what's displayed is good (e.g. if the next three items are all from Asia, it's good to intersperse something from Africa, Europe or the Americas).

  • The geographical center of New York City is in Queens.
  • The Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic in Lunenburg commemorates Atlantic Canada's fishing tradition, and exhibits include ships, an aquarium featuring native species, and a working boat building shop.
Göbekli Tepe site (1).JPG
  • Famed as the oldest temple in the world, and dated to 9000 BCE, Göbekli Tepe (ruins pictured) outside Urfa pre-dates farming and settlements.
  • Ponta do Seixas in João Pessoa is the easternmost mainland point in the Americas — there is a monument to mark the spot, as well as an odd lighthouse designed by Oscar Niemeyer, and it has a sweeping view of the Atlantic.
  • The Beilin Museum in Xian has a remarkable collection of 4000 inscribed stone tablets, covering scripture, poetry, classic Chinese texts, triumphs of rulers, family history, and practical affairs such as instructions to rebuild a school.
St Marks Church Zagreb.jpg
  • St. Mark's Church (pictured) in Zagreb is known for its colourful roof tiles depicting the coat of arms of Croatia and Zagreb.
  • A volcano is regarded as active if it has erupted within the last 10,000 years — less than a second in geological time.
  • Loveland, Colorado was founded in 1877 along the Colorado Central Railroad and was named after the company's president, William A.H. Loveland.
Shakespeare's Birthplace.jpg
  • Stratford-upon-Avon is best known as the home town of the great English playwright and poet, William Shakespeare (Shakespeare's birthplace pictured).
  • A popular attraction in Awasa are hippos — they can be seen from the shore of Lake Awasa, or from a boat.
  • Kelimutu near Ende is a holy mountain with three crater lakes, filled with water of different colors.
OceanCityNJ Boardwalk.jpg
  • The two and a half mile boardwalk (pictured) is the central focus of Ocean City's attractions — lined up with shops and restaurants of every kind, movie theaters, amusement rides, miniature golf courses, and a water park like no other.
  • Chaozhou considers itself the "Ceramic Capital of China" and you will notice that there are a lot of ceramics for sale, often at very inexpensive prices.
  • Nagpur can be considered the centre of India as the zero milestone of India is located in the city.
Big-Penguin-20070420-035.jpg
  • Penguin was named after the little penguins that used to wander around its beaches, and many things there (Big Penguin statue pictured), including bins, are shaped like penguins.
  • The Cyclades are the Greece of the travel posters: bare rocky islands adorned with brilliantly white cubistic villages soaring on hills above the wine-dark sea, and fringed with terrific beaches.
  • While Tibetan spelling in the written language is fairly standard throughout the ages and regions, pronunciation is very diverse and there are many, often mutually incomprehensible, dialects.
Pidjiguiti.jpg
  • The Pidjiguiti port (pictured) in Bissau was the site of the Pidjiguiti massacre on 3 August 1959, which became the beginning of the active resistance against the Portuguese colonial power.
  • Avarua is the main village on the northern side of Rarotonga and has most of the population and services — people tend to refer to it as the town.
  • Unlike most of France, Hauts-de-France is better known for its beer than wine.
Wakra Fort, Qatar.jpg
  • Housed in an old fort built in the early 20th century, Al Wakrah Museum (pictured) displays artifacts of marine life and local history.
  • Hoi An was the principal port of the Cham Kingdom, which controlled the strategic spice trade with Indonesia from the 7th-10th centuries and was a major international port in the 16th and 17th centuries.


On hold

The articles linked in from the entries below need to be improved before they're ready to go. Plunge forward, edit them, and move to the main queue. If you move trivia to this list, please provide a reason for doing so.


  • There are only two cities in North America situated on an isthmus, Madison and Seattle.
    Isn't Panama City (and every other city in Panama) situated on a large isthmus? I think this entry would need to be adjusted to be accurate. —Granger (talk · contribs) 23:15, 30 June 2017 (UTC)
    Also Rivas and San Juan del Sur Hobbitschuster (talk) 23:31, 30 June 2017 (UTC)
    I only copied what it says at Madison, "One of only two cities in North America situated on an isthmus (the other is Seattle)...", then changed it slightly to read well.  Seagull123  Φ  14:02, 10 July 2017 (UTC)
    Yeah, I think we should look up what the statement would have to look like to be accurate. Hobbitschuster (talk) 14:05, 10 July 2017 (UTC)
    IMO this is an unfixable fact. But if it's important to always have something here in the On hold section, I guess this one serves the purpose perfectly. ϒpsilon (talk) 17:13, 23 September 2017 (UTC)
By definition, Panama is an isthmus. I think that what's in the Madison article should be edited to reflect that those are the only two cities on isthmi in the Americas north of Central America. Ikan Kekek (talk) 23:16, 3 December 2017 (UTC)
Yes. As you said, use as many relevant links as there are. Ikan Kekek (talk) 04:26, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
It seems I have misinterpreted what the consensus was (or rather wasn't; the discussion doesn't seem to have come to any conclusion). This being the case, I apologise for interfering with your edits and citing a consensus that doesn't exist.
However, I do agree with Ypsi's original concerns that the entry should generally only link to the page where the fact is mentioned; in nearly all cases that is the destination / travel topic that is the entry's subject. Novelty architecture (as an article covering an entire field of study) is only tenuously related to this one specific ice hotel in Sweden. It's a bit like linking to Historical travel (very broad and general topic) in an entry about Herculaneum (a specific Roman archaeological site).
But we should really try to conclude that discussion one way or the other. --ThunderingTyphoons! (talk) 10:55, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
What if the fact is mentioned in more than one place? For instance, Chicken AK being named for ptarmigan is mentioned in both the town's article and places with unusual names. Likewise, it would make sense for the "ice hotel" concept to be mentioned both in their host cities and in the novelty architecture article. K7L (talk) 11:17, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
Well, ice hotels in general, and the specific hotel in question are both mentioned on novelty architecture, like you say. There are lots of cases like this where the same or similar information appears on more than one page. But the discover fact is about this hotel in particular (it being the very first of its kind), so that's the article we should link to, in my opinion. There could be a future discover entry specifically for the novelty architecture article, though, no problem. --ThunderingTyphoons! (talk) 11:48, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
The novelty architecture is the whole point of the item; the bit about "being first" was merely an arbitrary line drawn to avoid having to list all of the other hotels of the same genre - which are too numerous to fit in a twenty-word blurb. K7L (talk) 12:44, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
I still think we should link to just one article, the article where the fact appears. If we are to link to several articles, like the factoids in Wikipedia's Did you know (upon which our Discover section is based), I'd say we should also write the name of the article where the fact appears in bold letters, just like they do. --ϒpsilon (talk) 14:25, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
The facts do appear in places with unusual names (for Chicken) and novelty architecture (for the ice hotel). K7L (talk) 02:47, 19 December 2017 (UTC)
In these cases I still see the destination is the "main article" which should be highlighted somehow. It's Jukkasjärvi that has become famous because of the ice hotel representing Novelty architecture, not the other way around (ie. novelty architecture would still be around if they had built it in Gällivare instead, or not at all). In the same way, Chicken is famous because it has a funny name. --ϒpsilon (talk) 10:50, 19 December 2017 (UTC)
If the rest of you think it's best to have only one link per entry, I'll accede to that. Ikan Kekek (talk) 10:57, 19 December 2017 (UTC)
That's for the best. We can still have a fact relating to novelty architecture in the future, whereas linking two or more articles in one fact is basically using those articles up for the foreseeable future, in that we don't like repeat coverage of the same articles within a period of time. --ThunderingTyphoons! (talk) 11:26, 19 December 2017 (UTC)
I believe the concerns about duplication are that we don't want the same fact twice, not that we are trying to prevent two facts about the same destination from appearing at different times. This was raised at Wikivoyage talk:Discover#Repeating Discoveries and Same-type Discoveries before the WT split, and I think there was one we'd removed the better part of a year ago here as the same fact was mistakenly submitted twice, one month apart. K7L (talk) 13:34, 20 December 2017 (UTC)
We can certainly feature a single destination as many times as we like but I think there should be a couple of months between them at least. Intentionally featuring the same fact again is something we should avoid, though if this occasionally happens by accident (maybe because there have been so long time since it was featured that nobody remembers) I don't think it's a huge problem. For instance, the fact we had a few weeks back of Michigan's map resembling two hands was featured in October 2015 with a different wording. ϒpsilon (talk) 08:34, 21 December 2017 (UTC)
I'd prefer not to feature the same fact twice, or have three facts from the same country appear in the same three-day interval (like The [[Aleutian Islands]] of Alaska are the easternmost U.S. point", "[[Texas]] is the second-largest state, behind Alaska", "[[Wyoming]] is the second least-populous, behind Alaska")... unless this were April 1 or some occasion where the pattern is the joke. Conversely, I can't see a fact on big things in Australia being precluded because a fact on ice hotels had already run previously; both are technically novelty architecture. K7L (talk)

The following calendar-related items are "ready-to-go" criteria-wise and should be moved to the main queue at a date appropriate to the trivia featured: