Wikivoyage:Discover

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Here we collaborate on future discover facts that are featured on the Main Page (and on the Discover page).

Criteria

  • Keep it short and snappy: no more than twenty words, please.
  • At a minimum, [[link]] the article that contains the fact in question. The fact must be taken from a Wikivoyage article.
  • '''Boldface''' the fact of interest.
  • Linked articles don't need to be perfect, but preference should be given to those with a status of "usable" or higher.
  • Relevant images are required for one in every three facts. They should be placed above the fact in question, with the following formatting:
[[Image:imagename|right|100px|description]]
The interesting fact linked to this image goes here.
  • When looking for fun facts to add, Special:Random (also accessible in the left sidebar) which displays a random Wikivoyage article can be a useful tool. As many articles unfortunately are short on content, you may want to hit the link multiple times while opening up new articles in new tabs.

Now displayed


ParqueDeBombas.JPG
  • If you're looking for something special to buy in Lucknow, consider a chikan dress, a cotton dress with hand-made embroidery.
  • The former fire station, Parque de Bombas (pictured), is painted with highly distinctive red and black stripes and is the symbol of Ponce.
  • The Southeastern Islands of Bali, Indonesia, are splendid for diving, snorkeling, surfing, exploration and relaxing.


  • Updates are automatically handled by Template:Discover daily and each Discover entry is displayed for three days.
  • If the box above is empty, it means that the template has ran out of entries. If this happens you can add new entries from the nominations below. Any entries that are added to the template should be removed from the nominations list.
  • If you are unsure about how it works, feel free to try out things in the Discover sandbox first.
  • When the entry's sojourn on the Main Page is over, it should not just be deleted from the template but also added to the Discover archive.

Nominations

Add your entries to the end of this list. Do not leave any space or other commentary between entries. However, feel free to rearrange the list, because geographic variety in what's displayed is good (e.g. if the next three items are all from Asia, it's good to intersperse something from Africa, Europe or the Americas).

  • According to local belief, if you light a candle at the Old Town Gate of Zagreb and wish something, your wish will be granted.
  • While most Ottawans are English-speaking, 15% speak French natively, making Ottawa Canada's largest Francophone city outside of Quebec.
El Ghriba-01-sparklenose.jpg
  • El Ghriba Synagogue (interior pictured) is only a bit more than 100 years old, but it serves a Jewish community that has been in Djerba for at least 2,000 years and possibly as long as 3,000 years.
  • Kanazawa is one of the long overlooked jewels of Japanese tourism — although not by the Japanese, who visit in droves.
  • As Pilsen escaped relatively unscathed from the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, many of the buildings here are among the oldest in the city.
View of Pevek from the south.jpg
  • Pevek (pictured) is the northernmost town in Russia and used to be an important naval base and port in the Arctic.
  • The Schengen Area is not the same as the European Union (EU). Not all EU countries are part of the Schengen zone and not all Schengen countries are part of the EU.
  • Indigenous Fijian culture and tradition is very vibrant and is an integral component of everyday life for the majority of Fiji's population.
Wisconsin State Capitol Fountain.jpg
  • The dome (pictured) of Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison is one of the largest in the world in terms of volume.
  • Since it's such an essential need, along with "please" and "thank you", one of the first phrases any traveler should learn in the local language is "Where is the toilet?".
  • Cannabis is widely produced in Bihar and sold legally at licensed Bhang shops.
Murinsel nah.jpg
  • Originally a temporary project during 2003 for the Cultural Capital of Europe (Graz 2003) celebrations, people liked the artificial island Murinsel (pictured) enough so it stayed.
  • Golf as we understand it originated in Scotland, although it is probable that ancestor games to modern golf originated on the continent.
  • Casablanca has the world's largest artificial port, but no ferry service of any kind.
Stabroek.JPG
  • Stabroek Market (pictured) in Georgetown dates back to 1881, and the interesting design of this iron structure and clock tower certainly make it the most recognisable of buildings in the city.
  • With a population as high as 80,000, El Mirador was once one of the first large cities in North America.
  • The main market for most of Ulaanbaatar's residents, Naran Tuul is the place to go if you want to shop like a local.
GeishaObi.jpg
  • When wearing a kimono the most challenging part will be tying the obi (pictured).
  • Guadeloupe has been a French possession since 1635 except for the years 1813-1814 when it came into Swedish possession as a consequence of the Napoleonic Wars.
  • normal
Vijlen.jpg
  • Vijlen (pictured) promotes itself as the only "mountain village" in the the Netherlands, which of course is an exaggeration of its hill top position.
  • Many Meiji statesmen were born and raised in Hagi, such as Hirobumi Ito, the first Japanese Prime Minister.
  • It is not possible to travel far in Bhutan without seeing images of the 8th century sage of Vajrayana Buddhism, Guru Rinpoche.
Alice Springs from Anzac Hill.jpg
  • Alice Springs (pictured) is the heart of Central Australia and consists of cavernous gorges, boundless desert landscapes, remote Aboriginal communities and a charming pioneering history.
  • Cricket is the Antiguan sport. Games are played at the Recreation Ground in St John's or at any of the 365 beaches on the island.


On hold

The articles linked in from the entries below need to be improved before they're ready to go. Plunge forward, edit them, and move to the main queue. If you move trivia to this list, please provide a reason for doing so.


  • There are only two cities in North America situated on an isthmus, Madison and Seattle.
    Isn't Panama City (and every other city in Panama) situated on a large isthmus? I think this entry would need to be adjusted to be accurate. —Granger (talk · contribs) 23:15, 30 June 2017 (UTC)
    Also Rivas and San Juan del Sur Hobbitschuster (talk) 23:31, 30 June 2017 (UTC)
    I only copied what it says at Madison, "One of only two cities in North America situated on an isthmus (the other is Seattle)...", then changed it slightly to read well.  Seagull123  Φ  14:02, 10 July 2017 (UTC)
    Yeah, I think we should look up what the statement would have to look like to be accurate. Hobbitschuster (talk) 14:05, 10 July 2017 (UTC)
    IMO this is an unfixable fact. But if it's important to always have something here in the On hold section, I guess this one serves the purpose perfectly. ϒpsilon (talk) 17:13, 23 September 2017 (UTC)
By definition, Panama is an isthmus. I think that what's in the Madison article should be edited to reflect that those are the only two cities on isthmi in the Americas north of Central America. Ikan Kekek (talk) 23:16, 3 December 2017 (UTC)
Yes. As you said, use as many relevant links as there are. Ikan Kekek (talk) 04:26, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
It seems I have misinterpreted what the consensus was (or rather wasn't; the discussion doesn't seem to have come to any conclusion). This being the case, I apologise for interfering with your edits and citing a consensus that doesn't exist.
However, I do agree with Ypsi's original concerns that the entry should generally only link to the page where the fact is mentioned; in nearly all cases that is the destination / travel topic that is the entry's subject. Novelty architecture (as an article covering an entire field of study) is only tenuously related to this one specific ice hotel in Sweden. It's a bit like linking to Historical travel (very broad and general topic) in an entry about Herculaneum (a specific Roman archaeological site).
But we should really try to conclude that discussion one way or the other. --ThunderingTyphoons! (talk) 10:55, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
What if the fact is mentioned in more than one place? For instance, Chicken AK being named for ptarmigan is mentioned in both the town's article and places with unusual names. Likewise, it would make sense for the "ice hotel" concept to be mentioned both in their host cities and in the novelty architecture article. K7L (talk) 11:17, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
Well, ice hotels in general, and the specific hotel in question are both mentioned on novelty architecture, like you say. There are lots of cases like this where the same or similar information appears on more than one page. But the discover fact is about this hotel in particular (it being the very first of its kind), so that's the article we should link to, in my opinion. There could be a future discover entry specifically for the novelty architecture article, though, no problem. --ThunderingTyphoons! (talk) 11:48, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
The novelty architecture is the whole point of the item; the bit about "being first" was merely an arbitrary line drawn to avoid having to list all of the other hotels of the same genre - which are too numerous to fit in a twenty-word blurb. K7L (talk) 12:44, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
I still think we should link to just one article, the article where the fact appears. If we are to link to several articles, like the factoids in Wikipedia's Did you know (upon which our Discover section is based), I'd say we should also write the name of the article where the fact appears in bold letters, just like they do. --ϒpsilon (talk) 14:25, 18 December 2017 (UTC)
The facts do appear in places with unusual names (for Chicken) and novelty architecture (for the ice hotel). K7L (talk) 02:47, 19 December 2017 (UTC)
In these cases I still see the destination is the "main article" which should be highlighted somehow. It's Jukkasjärvi that has become famous because of the ice hotel representing Novelty architecture, not the other way around (ie. novelty architecture would still be around if they had built it in Gällivare instead, or not at all). In the same way, Chicken is famous because it has a funny name. --ϒpsilon (talk) 10:50, 19 December 2017 (UTC)
If the rest of you think it's best to have only one link per entry, I'll accede to that. Ikan Kekek (talk) 10:57, 19 December 2017 (UTC)
That's for the best. We can still have a fact relating to novelty architecture in the future, whereas linking two or more articles in one fact is basically using those articles up for the foreseeable future, in that we don't like repeat coverage of the same articles within a period of time. --ThunderingTyphoons! (talk) 11:26, 19 December 2017 (UTC)
I believe the concerns about duplication are that we don't want the same fact twice, not that we are trying to prevent two facts about the same destination from appearing at different times. This was raised at Wikivoyage talk:Discover#Repeating Discoveries and Same-type Discoveries before the WT split, and I think there was one we'd removed the better part of a year ago here as the same fact was mistakenly submitted twice, one month apart. K7L (talk) 13:34, 20 December 2017 (UTC)
We can certainly feature a single destination as many times as we like but I think there should be a couple of months between them at least. Intentionally featuring the same fact again is something we should avoid, though if this occasionally happens by accident (maybe because there have been so long time since it was featured that nobody remembers) I don't think it's a huge problem. For instance, the fact we had a few weeks back of Michigan's map resembling two hands was featured in October 2015 with a different wording. ϒpsilon (talk) 08:34, 21 December 2017 (UTC)
I'd prefer not to feature the same fact twice, or have three facts from the same country appear in the same three-day interval (like The [[Aleutian Islands]] of Alaska are the easternmost U.S. point", "[[Texas]] is the second-largest state, behind Alaska", "[[Wyoming]] is the second least-populous, behind Alaska")... unless this were April 1 or some occasion where the pattern is the joke. Conversely, I can't see a fact on big things in Australia being precluded because a fact on ice hotels had already run previously; both are technically novelty architecture. K7L (talk)

The following calendar-related items are "ready-to-go" criteria-wise and should be moved to the main queue at a date appropriate to the trivia featured: