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Dublin Airport (DUB IATA) is the main airport serving Ireland.

Understand[edit]

Dublin Airport, May 2011 (17).JPG

Dublin Airport is located about 10 kilometres north of Dublin City Centre, near the town of Swords. It is the dominant airport serving Ireland and Northern Ireland, accounting for over 70% of all air traffic in and out of the island of Ireland. The airport served 32.9 million passengers in 2019, making it the 12th busiest airport in Europe.

Dublin is the home airport for Aer Lingus, Ireland's former national airline, who operate a large hub of UK, European and North American routes. It is also the home airport and second largest operating base for Irish low cost airline Ryanair. Both airlines have their head offices in the vicinity of the airport.

Dublin is the only European hub airport with a US Preclearance facility, which allows passengers to clear US immigration and customs, public health and agriculture inspections prior to boarding their flight in Dublin. Passengers then bypass these checks on arrival in the US, and can walk directly out of the terminal or to a connecting flight without any delays. The only other European airport, also in Ireland, which offers those services is Shannon airport with a much more modest offer of flights.

Flights[edit]

Christmas Day

Dublin is the only major airport in the world which doesn't stay open 365 days of the year. On the 25th of December each year (Christmas Day), the airport shuts down its terminals and runways for 24 hours, with no departures or arrivals during this time. On Christmas Day, in a long tradition, the airport’s parish priest performs the annual "Blessing of the Planes" on each aircraft.

As all other airports and ports in Ireland also close, it is not actually possible to travel in or out of Ireland on Christmas Day, so the island is completely cut off from the rest of the world for the day (although Shannon Airport remains open for emergencies and refueling).

With the tower closed, the airspace surrounding the airport reverts to uncontrolled airspace for the day, so no clearance is required to fly in the vicinity of the airport. Private light aircraft sometimes land on the runway, just to get the rare opportunity to fly into a major international airport. While this practice is not officially allowed, the authorities generally tolerate it as long as they stay beside the runway and don’t stray any further.

Destinations[edit]

Europe[edit]

Dublin has an extensive short haul network across Europe, dominated by Aer Lingus and Ryanair, who fly to over 70 and over 100 destinations respectively. These include flights to most major cities across Great Britain, continental Europe and Scandinavia, as well as to sun holiday destinations in the Canary Islands, the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea.

There is strong competition between Aer Lingus and Ryanair, with both airlines competing directly against each other on a large number of routes, which has benefited passengers with low fares regularly available. In most cases, both airlines operate to the same airports, although in some cities Aer Lingus serves the larger and more central airports (e.g. London Heathrow, Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport, Venice Marco Polo) while Ryanair serves smaller airports at a further distance from the city (e.g. London Luton, Paris Beauvais, Venice Treviso).

In addition to the two Irish airlines, many European airlines also operate routes from Dublin to their own respective hubs, with onward connections available through their networks. Some of these include British Airways to London Heathrow, Air France to Paris Charles de Gaulle, KLM to Amsterdam Schiphol, Lufthansa to Frankfurt Airport, Aeroflot to Moscow-Sheremetyevo and Turkish Airlines to Istanbul Airport.

Great Britain is particularly well-served from Dublin, with Aer Lingus and Ryanair each flying to 14 different airports. These include the main cities like London, Birmingham, Manchester and Glasgow, but also smaller regional airports such as Aberdeen, Bristol, Newquay and the Isle of Man. Other airlines operating to the UK are British Airways to London City and London Heathrow, Eastern Airways to Teesside and Southampton, and Blue Islands to Southampton.

Dublin is one of a small number of airports with direct flights to all six London airports (Heathrow, Gatwick, Stansted, Luton, City and Southend). The Dublin-London air route is the busiest in Europe and the second busiest international route in the world, with over 100 flights a day across Aer Lingus, British Airways and Ryanair.

The only domestic routes available from Dublin are with Aer Lingus to Donegal and Kerry. Due to Ireland's small size, most of the island can be more easily reached by ground public transport instead (see #By bus).

North America[edit]

Due to Ireland's location on the western edge of Europe, and its strong diaspora links with North America, Dublin has always had good long haul transatlantic connections. The airport has developed into a transfer hub connecting passengers between Europe and North America, helped by the presence of the US Border Preclearance facility.

Aer Lingus operates the largest network from Dublin to the United States of America, with 13 routes to Boston Logan Airport, Chicago O'Hare, Hartford, Los Angeles International Airport, Miami International Airport, Minneapolis–Saint Paul International Airport, New York JFK Airport, Newark Liberty Airport, Orlando International Airport, Philadelphia International Airport, San Francisco Airport, Seattle Tacoma Airport and Washington Dulles Airport. Other airlines operating to the USA are American Airlines to Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and Philadelphia, Delta to Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Boston and New York JFK, and United to Chicago, Newark Liberty, San Francisco and Washington.

Routes to Canada include Aer Lingus to Toronto Pearson International Airport, Air Canada to Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver, Air Transat to Toronto, and WestJet to Calgary and Halifax.

Asia and Africa[edit]

All direct long haul routes to Asia and Africa are with non-European airlines.

Dublin is well served by the main Middle Eastern carriers, with Emirates to Dubai Airport, Etihad Airways to Abu Dhabi International Airport and Qatar Airways to Doha Hamad Airport, all of which provide connections through their networks to many destinations across Asia, Africa and Australasia.

At the southeast corner of the Mediterranean there are routes with El Al to Ben Gurion Airport and with EgyptAir to Cairo. Ethiopian Airlines provides the only direct flights to Sub-Saharan Africa, to Addis Ababa, while Cathay Pacific operates the only route to East Asia, to Hong Kong International Airport. As of Feb 2021, it is the longest direct route from Dublin.

Layout[edit]

Map of Dublin Airport

Dublin has two passenger terminals, which are adjacent and connected to each other. Terminal 2 is used by Aer Lingus, American Airlines, Delta, Emirates, Norwegian and United, while Terminal 1 is used by Ryanair and all other airlines. An enclosed walkway connects the Departures Level of Terminal 1 with the Arrivals Level of Terminal 2.

Once you pass through security in both terminals, you are within a common departures area, and you can freely walk between the shopping areas and boarding gates across both terminals. There are five main boarding gate areas, which from north to south are:

  • Pier 1 (Gates 101-121) is to the far north of Terminal 1 and is mainly used by Ryanair. It is connected to Terminal 1 by an elevated walkway curving around the front of the Original 1940 Central Terminal Building.
  • Pier 2 (Gates 201-224) is to the northwest of Terminal 1 and is mainly used by Ryanair, as well as a number of other airlines. These are the oldest boarding gates in the airport. Gates 217-220 are bus boarding gates located within the ground floor of the Original 1940 Central Terminal Building.
  • Pier 3 (Gates 301-307A) is directly off Terminal 1, but is shared by flights from both terminals, and is used by many different airlines. Passengers from Terminal 2 have to pass through both the Terminal 2 and Terminal 1 shopping areas to reach Pier 3.
    • Gates 332-337 are bus boarding gates located on the ground floor of the link corridor between Terminals 1 & 2.
  • Pier 4 (Gates 401-426) is directly off Terminal 2 and is mainly used by Aer Lingus, US carriers and Emirates. The ground floor of Pier 4 (Gates 401-406) contains the US Preclearance facility, so all flights to the USA depart from this area.
  • The South Gates are a remote boarding area mainly used by Aer Lingus. They can only be reached by a shuttle bus from Gate 335. As these flights are listed as Gate 335, and your boarding card is scanned before boarding the bus, this can oddly look like multiple flights are boarding through the same gate simultaneously. However, when you reach the South Gates, there are another 5 boarding gates (A to E), from where you can walk straight out to your aircraft.

Departures[edit]

In Terminal 2, check-in is located on the ground floor. The left hand side of the check-in hall (Desks 1 to 28) is used by American Airlines, Delta, Emirates, Norwegian and United, while the right hand side (Desks 29 to 56) is used by Aer Lingus. After check-in, take the escalators or lifts to the second floor, where you can pass through security screening to get into the boarding gates.

In Terminal 1, check-in is divided into twelve "Areas", numbered from 3 to 14. Check-in Areas 3 to 13 are located in the main check-in hall on the first floor, while Check-in Area 14 is located on the lower ground floor. Ryanair uses Check-in Area 13. After check-in, entry to security screening and boarding gates is situated at the left end of the main check-in hall.

Dublin Airport recommends checking-in at least 90 minutes before departure for flights within Europe, and at least 3 hours before departure for long haul flights. If you're travelling to the US, this is particularly important as you need to leave additional time to pass through US Preclearance. Check the information screens in the central area to find out when you need to proceed to US Preclearance, which will be before your flight is scheduled to board. You cannot return to the main shops and restaurants after passing through US Preclearance, although there is a small shop and cafe available after it.

US Preclearance[edit]

Dublin is unique in that it is the only hub airport in Europe which has a United States Border Preclearance facility. This facility allows passengers to clear US immigration and customs, public health and agriculture inspections prior to boarding their flight in Dublin. Precleared flights arrive into the US as domestic flights, so on arrival passengers can walk directly out of the airport or to a connecting flight without any further checks.

This can be very beneficial, as it avoids sometimes long queues at immigration on arrival in some US airports, and reduces the likelihood of missing a connecting flight. It also allows flights to arrive into airports or domestic terminals without US immigration facilities. However, the drawback is that you need to leave extra time to pass through Preclearance prior to boarding your flight in Dublin.

At Preclearance, you first have to present your boarding pass. Next, you are required to go through TSA screening, the US standard of security screening. All footwear must be removed, but belts and jewellery can be kept on. After TSA screening, you present your passport to a US Border Protection officer, who will ask questions about the purpose of your visit and whether you have any items to declare. Most passengers are finished at this point, but if you have any items to declare you will be taken to another area to hand up any items.

It is important to note that once you pass through Preclearance, you are considered to be entering the United States of America, and US laws and regulations apply from that point onwards. For example, you cannot take fruit with you to eat on the flight, because you are prohibited from bringing fruit into America, and this will have to be declared at Preclearance. Or if you want to purchase or consume alcohol on the flight, you must be over the US age limit of 21, not the Irish age limit of 18.

Arrivals[edit]

If you have arrived from an EU country, you should exit baggage reclaim through the blue customs channel. If you have arrived from a non-EU country, you should exit through the green channel if you have nothing to declare, or through the red channel if you have items to declare or are in doubt.

Flight connections[edit]

If your bags have been checked through to your final destination, and you already have your boarding pass for your connecting flight, follow the signs for Flight Connections on arrival into Dublin. Aer Lingus passengers without a boarding pass can also follow the signs for flight connections and collect their boarding pass at the Aer Lingus flight connections desk. After passing through the flight connections facility, all gates are within walking distance.

If your bags haven't been checked through to your final destination or you don't have a boarding pass for your connecting flight, you will need to pass through Irish immigration, collect your bags, exit through Irish customs, and proceed to the relevant check-in area for your flight. Both terminals in Dublin are connected to each other, so if your arriving and departing flights are at different terminals, you can easily walk from one to the other.

Transiting flights[edit]

Ethiopian Airlines flights from Addis Ababa to Chicago, Toronto and Washington DC stopover in Dublin. However, this stopover is solely for refueling. If you are a passenger on one of these flights, you cannot leave the aircraft while in Dublin, and you cannot avail of the US Preclearance facility. These flights usually park on the western apron, away from the passenger terminals, so you can at least experience clear views across the whole airfield.

Ground transportation[edit]

From most places, public transport is the easiest and cheapest way to get to and from Dublin Airport. The airport has no direct rail service but has an extensive bus network with direct routes to the main areas of the city and to most cities and large towns across the island of Ireland. Taxis are also good value if travelling with a few people within the city, but can be expensive for longer journeys.

The airport is easily accessible by road, adjacent to the M1 Dublin-Belfast motorway, and Dublin's M50 ring motorway. Drop-off areas and short term car parks are provided adjacent to the terminals, while long term car parks are connected to the terminals by shuttle bus. Numerous car rental agencies are also based at the airport.

Ground transportation at Dublin Airport is divided into different zones numbered from 1 to 21, roughly along a semicircle walk from Terminal 1 to Terminal 2, as follows:

Terminal 1
Zones 1 to 4: Terminal 1 Arrivals Road, Buses and Taxis
Zones 5 to 7: Terminal 1 Short Term Car Parks
Zones 8 to 15: Atrium Road, Buses and Coaches
Zone 16: Coach Park
Zones 17 to 19: Terminal 2 Short Term Car Parks
Zones 20 to 21: Terminal 2 Arrivals Road, Buses and Taxis
Terminal 2

A map of the ground transportation zones is available here.

By bus[edit]

Dublin Airport is one of the best served places in Ireland when it comes to bus services. A large network of local, regional and intercity bus routes operate to different parts of the city, as well as to many cities and towns throughout the whole island of Ireland. In total, over 60 scheduled bus routes serve the airport. When hotel, car park, car rental and staff shuttle buses are added to this, somewhere in the region of 4,000 buses serve the airport on a daily basis, more than five times the number of flights!

The airport is served by the city's public transport system, as well as by a number of premium airport express services. Intercity routes are operated by numerous commercial operators, and many routes have more than one operator competing on them. Due to the extensive number of bus routes, bus operators and bus stops at Dublin Airport, it can be difficult to find the stop you are looking for. However, as a general rule:

  • Airlink Express and Dublin Express services operate from both the 1 Terminal 1 Bus Stops (Zones 1 & 2) and 2 Terminal 2 Bus Stops (Zones 20 & 21), located on the arrivals roads outside each terminal.
  • Aircoach, Bus Éireann, Citylink, Dublin Bus, Expressway, Go-Ahead Ireland, GoBus and Translink services all depart from the 3 Atrium Road Bus Stops (Zones 10 to 15), a 5-minute walk from both terminals.
  • All other buses depart from the 4 Coach Park (Zone 16), a 10-minute walk from both terminals.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport schedules are subject to change and some services may temporarily be suspended, so check with the relevant operator for the most up to date information.

City network[edit]

Dublin Airport is covered by the city's public transport network, of which buses are jointly operated by Dublin Bus and Go-Ahead Ireland. These are the cheapest options for getting into the city, and would be the preferred option by most locals and airport workers.

A single fare into the city centre is €3.30 if paying with cash, or €2.50 if paying with a rechargeable Leap Card. Note that city buses accept coins only, and if you don't have the exact fare, no change is given. If you will be using public transport while in Dublin, it might be better value to get a Leap Card or a Leap Visitor Card, which can be used across all public transport in Dublin.

See Dublin#Get around for full details on public transport in Dublin, including routes, fares, ticketing and journey planning.

All city buses depart from Zone 15:

  • Route 16 operates from the airport into the city centre and onwards to Ballinteer in the south of the city, every 12 minutes Monday to Saturday and every 15 minutes on Sundays.
  • Route 41 operates from Swords via the airport into the city centre, every 20 minutes throughout the day and every 30 minutes throughout the night, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Route 33a operates north to Swords, Lusk, Rush and Skerries, every 90 minutes Monday to Sunday. Nitelink route 33n provides a late night service on Friday and Saturday nights.
  • Route 102 operates northeast to Swords, Malahide, Portmarnock and Sutton, every 30 minutes Monday to Sunday.

Other city services[edit]

The following commercial bus services also operate into Dublin City. These services are specifically targeted at airport users, and have significantly higher fares than the normal city buses (e.g. single to city centre €6-€8, return €9-€11), but they are generally quicker, more comfortable, have plenty of luggage space and operate closer to the main hotels:

  • Aircoach operates three routes to the city centre and southeast of the city, departing from Zone 11:
    • Route 700 operates to O’Connell Street and St. Stephen’s Green in the city centre and onwards to University College Dublin, Stillorgan and Leopardstown in the south of the city. Buses run every 15 minutes throughout the day and every 30 minutes throughout the night, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
    • Route 702 operates along the southeast coast of the city to Ballsbridge, Foxrock, Bray and Greystones, every hour, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
    • Route 703 operates along the southeast coast of the city to Ballsbridge, Blackrock, Dún Laoghaire and Killiney, every hour, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Airlink Express operates two routes into the city centre, departing from Zone 2 (Terminal 1) and Zone 20 (Terminal 2):
    • Route 747 operates to Connolly Station, Busáras Bus Station, O’Connell Street and Heuston Station in the city centre, every 30 minutes Monday to Sunday.
    • Route 757 operates to Merrion Square and Camden Street in the south city centre, every 30 minutes Monday to Sunday.
  • Dublin Express operates three routes into the city centre, departing from Zone 1 (Terminal 1) and Zone 21 (Terminal 2):
    • Route 782 operates to George’s Quay and Usher’s Quay, every hour, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
    • Route 783 operates to George’s Quay, every hour, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
    • Route 784 operates to George’s Quay and Merrion Square, every hour, 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
  • Airport Hopper operates two routes to the western parts of the city, departing from Zone 16 (Coach Park):
    • Route 767 operates to Liffey Valley, Lucan, Leixlip and Maynooth, every hour Monday to Sunday.
    • Route 777 operates to Liffey Valley, Clondalkin and Tallaght, every hour Monday to Sunday.
  • Dublin Coach operates an express route to the south of the city, departing from Zone 16 (Coach Park):
    • Route 750 operates to the Red Cow Luas and Dundrum, every 30 minutes Monday to Sunday.

Regional services[edit]

A number of regional bus services operate to the nearby counties surrounding Dublin. Single cash fares on these routes range up to a maximum of €14, but for most places will be below €10. Listed anticlockwise from north to south, the routes are:

  • Bus Éireann route 101 operates north to Balbriggan, Julianstown and Drogheda, every 30 minutes Monday to Saturday and every 60 minutes on Sundays. Departs from Zone 11, Stop 6.
  • Bus Éireann route 100X operates north to Drogheda and Dundalk, every 1 to 2 hours Monday to Sunday. Departs from Zone 14, Stop 14.
  • Bus Éireann route 109A operates northwest to Ashbourne, Navan and Kells, every hour, 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Departs from Zone 11, Stop 6.
  • M4 Direct route 842 operates west to Mullingar, Edgeworthstown and Ballymahon, twice per day Monday to Sunday.
  • Dublin Coach route 726 operates southwest to Naas, Newbridge, Kildare and Portlaoise, every hour, 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Departs from Zone 16 (Coach Park).
  • JJ Kavanagh route 737 operates southwest to Naas, every hour Monday to Sunday. Departs from Zone 16 (Coach Park).
  • Bus Éireann route 133X operates south to Newtownmountkennedy, Rathnew and Wicklow, 3 times outbound each evening and 3 times inbound each morning, Monday to Friday. Departs from Zone 11, Stop 6.
  • Wexford Bus route 740A operates south to Rathnew, Wickow, Arklow and Gorey, every 1-2 hours Monday to Sunday. Departs from Zone 16 (Coach Park).

Intercity services[edit]

Intercity services operate directly from Dublin Airport to most cities and large towns across the island of Ireland. The maximum walk-up cash fare on any service is €26, but for most places will be well below this, and cheaper fares are available on most routes if booked online in advance, or if booked as return tickets. Intercity services are operated by numerous commercial operators, and many routes have more than one operator competing on them, so it's a good idea to check each operator's website to find the best value fare for your day and time.

Listed anticlockwise from north to south, the different intercity routes are:

Hotel shuttles[edit]

Shuttle buses to on-airport hotels (Maldron and Radisson Blu) depart from both the Terminal 1 Arrivals Road (Zone 8) and the Terminal 2 Departures Road (from Terminal 2 Arrivals, take the escalator down to Check-in, go outside onto the Departures Road, and turn right).

Shuttle buses to all off-airport hotels depart from the Coach Park (Zone 16).

By train[edit]

Dublin Airport is - as of 2021- not served by any rail services, although a Metro line is planned to be built from the airport into the city centre by 2027.

However, bus services are available to the main city centre stations and to nearby suburban stations:

  • Airlink route 747 operates to Connolly Station and Heuston Station in the city centre:
    • Connolly Station serves the cross-border Enterprise train to Belfast in Northern Ireland, as well as Intercity trains to Sligo in the northwest and Wexford in the southeast.
    • Heuston Station serves Intercity trains to the south and west of Ireland, including Cork, Galway, Kilkenny, Limerick, Tralee, Waterford and Westport.
  • Route 16 and route 41 operate to Drumcondra Station, served by the Maynooth Commuter line.
  • Route 102 operates to Malahide Station and Sutton Station, served by the Northern Commuter line and the DART.

See Rail travel in Ireland for more details on train services and purchasing tickets.

By taxi[edit]

Taxis can be picked up from either the 5 Terminal 1 Taxi Rank (Zone 3) or the 6 Terminal 2 Taxi Rank (Zone 20), located on the arrivals roads outside each terminal.

All taxis in Ireland are metered with a €3.80 initial charge and then the greater of €1.14/km or €0.40/minute. A premium rate applies at night and on Sundays, while extra charges apply for each additional passenger. While exact fares will vary depending on traffic, a taxi to the city centre will typically cost €25-30, while to Heuston Station will typically cost €30-40. A taxi fare estimator is available here.

While ridesharing apps are available in Ireland, unlicensed taxis are illegal, so such apps can only be used to hail regular licenced taxis. Free Now is the most popular ride hailing app in Ireland, and can be used to hail taxis to the airport. If travelling from the airport, it's better to just use the official taxi ranks. App-hailed taxis are prohibited from picking up at the taxi ranks and have to park in the short term car parks instead, so you'll have further to walk, and may have to pay an additional surcharge for parking.

By car[edit]

Car rental[edit]

Car rental companies based in Dublin Airport include the international chains Alamo, Avis, Budget, Enterprise, Europcar, Hertz, National and Sixt, as well as Irish car rental companies:

  • Dooley Car Rental, +353 1 844 5151. Dan Dooley is a long-standing Irish brand that was purchased by Enterprise in 2017, but is still operated as an independent brand. Prices include all compulsory insurances, unlimited mileage and 24-hour breakdown cover.
  • NewWay Car Rental, +353 1 6057588, . An Irish-owned, all-inclusive car hire firm with rates including all insurance and excess cover, as well as the cross-border fee normally associated with driving a rental car into Northern Ireland. Don't expect any upsells at pickup or the usual deposit or credit card pre-authorisation, the price you book for is the price you pay. All cars are parked at the terminal, with no shuttle bus transfer required.

In Terminal 1, car rental companies have their desks within the main arrivals hall, after exiting through customs. Shuttle buses to off-airport cars depart from Zone 4, on the road immediately outside the arrivals hall.

In Terminal 2, car rental companies have their desks within the Multi-Storey Car Park (after exiting through customs, keep walking straight ahead and across the glass bridge). Some cars are parked within the Multi-Storey Car Park, while shuttle buses to off-airport cars depart from the ground floor of the Multi-Storey Car Park, on the road outside, behind the lifts.

When returning rental cars, most are required to be returned to the 7 Eastlands car hire facility just outside the airport (follow signs for Long Term Parking, then for Express Red Parking). Some cars are required to be returned to the Terminal 2 Multi-Storey Car Park instead (follow signs for Terminal 2 Parking, at the entrance to the car park there is a lane for car rental returns).

Fuel stations are available along the R132 road, to the north and south of the airport. There is also a fuel station within the airport, located on the main exit road. To access this, you need to drive through either the Terminal 1 or Terminal 2 set down road, then follow signs for exit, and the entrance for the fuel station is on your left.

Dropping off and picking up[edit]

When collecting or picking up passengers, the easiest option is to park in one of the short term car parks, adjacent to the terminals. The cost of parking in the short term car parks is €3 for the first hour and €4.50 for each additional hour, up to a maximum of €40 per day. Luggage trolleys can be brought from the terminals out to all of these car parks.

There are five short term car parks available:

  • 8 Terminal 1 Car Park A, Zone 5 (follow signs for Terminal 1 Parking, when the road passes under Terminal 2, turn to your right and the entrance is immediately on your left). 450 space multi-story car park adjacent to Terminal 1. Height restriction is 1.85 metres.
  • 9 Terminal 1 Car Park B, Zone 6 (follow signs for Terminal 1 Parking, when the road passes under Terminal 2, keep to your right and follow signs for disabled parking, turn left immediately after Car Park A, the entrance is further down the road on your left). 50 space ground floor car park for persons with reduced mobility only. All spaces are wheelchair accessible and have been treated with a special non-slip surface.
  • 10 Terminal 1 Car Park C, Zone 7 (follow signs for Terminal 1 Parking, when the road passes under Terminal 2, keep to your right and continue past the bus stops, the entrance is immediately in front of you). 1,500 space multi-storey car park adjacent to Terminal 1. Height restriction is 1.85 metres.
  • 11 Terminal 2 Surface Car Park, Zone 17 (follow signs for Terminal 2 Departures, continue through the set down area and around the corner, the entrance is immediately on your left). 270 space surface car park adjacent to Terminal 2. Suitable for high vehicles.
  • 12 Terminal 2 Multi-Storey Car Park, Zone 19 (keep to your right when entering the airport and follow signs for Terminal 2 Parking). 1,800 space multi-storey car park adjacent to Terminal 2. Height restriction is 2.1 metres. 40 spaces are designated for persons with reduced mobility, which are wheelchair accessible and have been treated with a special non-slip surface.

An alternative option to avoid using the short term car parks is to wait at a safe location outside of the airport campus, get the person you are collecting to give you a phone call, and then collect them from the departures set down area at either terminal. Waiting is not permitted at the set down areas, and airport police will move on any vehicles found to be waiting, so the person you are collecting must be ready to hop into your vehicle as soon as you drive up to the set down area. There are a few plane spotter lay-bys around the edge of the airport which are good spots to wait, although these can be lonely late at night and are best avoided.

Long term parking[edit]

Long term parking options at Dublin Airport include three official airport car parks, one privately operated car park and numerous hotels, all of which have dedicated shuttle buses to and from the airport:

  • Dublin Airport Car Parking, +353 1 9440440, .
    • 13 Express Red Car Park (take exit 2 off the M1 motorway, when arriving into the airport stay to the left following signs for Long Term Parking, continue straight through the first set of traffic lights and the entrance is to the left at the second set of traffic lights). The closest long term car park, with 8,000 spaces. A 5-minute shuttle bus ride from the terminals, with a 24-hour shuttle bus, running every 10 minutes. 24-hour security. €9.50 per day, lower rates available if pre-booked online.
    • 14 Holiday Blue Car Park (take exit 4 off the M50 motorway and follow the R108 towards Naul, continue straight through the crossroads and the road curves to run parallel with the runway, the entrance is on your left). A cheaper long term car park located a little further from the airport, with 8,000 spaces. A 10-minute shuttle bus ride from the terminals, with a 24-hour shuttle bus, running every 15 minutes. 24-hour security. €8.50 per day, lower rates available if pre-booked online.
    • 15 Express Green Car Park (take exit 2 off the M1 motorway, when arriving into the airport stay to the left following signs for Long Term Parking, the entrance is the first turn on your left). An overflow long term car park open during the summer season only, and intended for those departing and arriving at the weekend, so the shuttle buses only operate Fridays to Mondays. Pre-booking online is required for this car park. 24-hour security.
  • 16 Quickpark (take exit 2 off the M1 motorway, when arriving into the airport stay to the left following signs for Long Term Parking, continue straight through three sets of traffic lights and the entrance is on your right), +353 1 8621977, . A privately operated long term car park. A 5-minute shuttle bus ride from the terminals, with a 24-hour shuttle bus, running every 5 minutes. 24-hour security. €10 per day, lower rates available if pre-booked online.
  • Most hotels in close proximity to the airport offer "Stay, Park & Fly" packages, where you can stay the night before or after your trip, park your car at the hotel for the duration of your trip, and avail of the hotel's shuttle bus to and from the airport. These are a good option if you are driving a long distance to the airport and have an early morning flight, as you can avoid driving through the night. If you are arriving back from a late evening or a long haul flight, it can also give you the opportunity to get a good night's sleep before making your long drive. See #Stay for nearby hotels.

When returning back to your car after your trip, shuttle buses to the official airport car parks (Express Red, Holiday Blue, Express Green) depart from Zones 8 & 9 at Terminal 1 and Zone 21 at Terminal 2. Shuttle buses to Quickpark depart from Zone 9 (for both terminals), while shuttle buses to all hotels depart from the Coach Park (Zone 16).

By bicycle[edit]

The R132 road between Dublin City Centre and the town of Swords (via Dublin Airport) has cycle lanes along almost its entire length. However the quality of this varies, from segregated off-road cycle tracks in some parts to just a painted line at the side of the road in other parts. By Irish standards, the route is quite good for cycling, although it would be below the standard expected in many European countries. Segregated cycle lanes are also provided within the airport campus, from the R132 road up to the terminals and short term car parks.

Dublin Airport doesn't advertise bicycle parking on their official website, although many cyclists have reported on forum sites that there is free bicycle parking available in both the Terminal 1 and Terminal 2 multi-storey car parks. This seems to be unofficial practice, with cyclists advising to look and copy where other bicycles are parked and locked to, and to avoid blocking anything. However, this is reported to be fine by airport authorities and generally safe, with bike thefts very rare.

With the exception of Airlink, Dublin Bus and Go-Ahead Ireland services, nearly all bus services to and from Dublin Airport are operated by coaches with large luggage compartments, so there should generally be no issues with taking a bicycle with you on one. However, an additional fee might apply, and different operators may have different policies, so it is best to check this with the relevant operator in advance.

Get around[edit]

While Dublin has been expanded a lot, it is still relatively compact in comparison to many other large airports. All terminals and gates are within walking distance of each other, and there is no need for any bus or train transfers. All ground transport options are within a short walk of both terminals, while shuttle buses operate to and from the long term car parks and car rental facilities.

For passengers with reduced mobility, or who are unable to walk long distances, the airport provides free assistance:

  • OCS, +353 1 7047783, . Dublin Airport have appointed OCS to provide mobility assistance within the airport. Passengers can be accompanied for their journey through the airport and can be taken by wheelchair to and from their aircraft. All passengers who require this service should book it through their airline, travel agent or tour operator at least 48 hours before flying.

Landside (public areas)[edit]

Within Terminal 1, Arrivals is located on the Ground Floor, with Check-in and Departures located on the First Floor (with the exception of Check-in area 14, which is located in the Basement). The Second Floor contains some food outlets.

Within Terminal 2, Check-in is located on the Ground Floor, Arrivals on the First Floor, and entry to security for Departures is located on the Second Floor.

To get between both terminals, a link corridor connects the Arrivals level of Terminal 2 to the Departures level of Terminal 1. Luggage trolleys are available to use free of charge within the public areas of the terminals.

Airside (after security)[edit]

After passing through security in each terminal, you are within a single departures area, and you can freely walk between both terminals and all boarding gates. The longest walk from security in Terminal 2 to any gate is about 550 metres, while the longest walk from security in Terminal 1 to any gate is about 900 metres.

Longer sections have moving travelators, so you'll never have to physically walk this full distance. On the longest sections, the airport also runs a buggy up and down them, which offers lifts to elderly people or those with reduced mobility.

As both terminals are adjacent and connected to each other, this means that passengers in each terminal can also avail of the shops and restaurants located in the other terminal. While it is only a 250 metre walk between both terminals, the shopping areas in each terminal are not signposted from each other:

  • To get from Terminal 2 to the Terminal 1 shopping area, follow the signs for Gates 101-307A. This will take you through the link corridor between both terminals and into the Terminal 1 shopping area. The link corridor might look like it's one-way only, but don't worry, once you reach the Terminal 1 shopping area, you can access all boarding gates, and you can also return back to the Terminal 2 shopping area (see next).
  • To get from Terminal 1 to the Terminal 2 shopping area, follow the signs for Gates 401-426. This will take you through the link corridor between both terminals and past some airline lounges. When you reach Gates 401-426, there is a high escalator which will take you up to the Terminal 2 shopping area. From the Terminal 2 shopping area, you can access all boarding gates and you can also return back to the Terminal 1 shopping area.

Wait[edit]

Lounges[edit]

There are four lounges within the main departure areas of both terminals. Note that if you are travelling to the USA, you can only avail of these lounges before going through US Preclearance (see next list below for after):

  • Dublin Airport Lounges, +353 1 8144779, . Dublin Airport's lounges in each terminal provide a tranquil, comfortable and air-conditioned setting. Complimentary drinks, snacks, newspapers and magazines are available, along with a dedicated Business Centre providing computer access and free Wi-Fi access. €25 pre-booked online, €29 at reception.
    • 1 The Lounge, Terminal 1, Terminal 1 Departures, Second Floor (between the security lanes, accessible by the lift or stairs).
    • 2 The Lounge, Terminal 2, Terminal 2 Departures, near 400's Gates (take escalator down to Gates 401-426, turn right and follow signs for airline lounges).
  • 3 Aer Lingus Lounge, Terminal 2 Departures, near 400's Gates (take escalator down to Gates 401-426, turn right and follow signs for airline lounges). Enjoy modern surroundings while you relax for your flight, with complimentary Wi-Fi, refreshments and newspapers. €30.
  • 4 The East Lounge, Link corridor between Terminals 1 & 2 (follow signs for Gates 401-426, then for airline lounges). The interior design and feel of the East Lounge is underpinned by the concept of east meeting west. The lounge is divided into work, relaxation, bar and dining areas. As well as premium food and drink facilities, it offers a concierge service, luxury shower rooms, a quiet prayer room, an entertainment area, charging outlets for multiple devices and high speed unlimited WiFi. €50 pre-booked online, complimentary for first and business class guests travelling eastwards.

There is one lounge located after US Preclearance, which can only be accessed by passengers travelling to the USA:

  • 5 51st&Green Lounge, Terminal 2, after US Preclearance (between Gates 405 and 406). The closest airport lounge in the world to an active runway provides breath-taking runway views and somewhere to enjoy a few hours of rest and relaxation before your long-haul flight. Lounge access includes drinks, snacks & fresh Irish dishes with an American twist, barista coffee and cocktails, high speed Wi-Fi to download in-flight entertainment, entertainment screen with live sports, quiet space to work with multiple charging units and shower facilities to freshen up before your flight. €35 pre-booked online, €39 at reception, complimentary for business class guests.

Aer Lingus operate the only arrivals lounge in Dublin:

  • 6 Aer Lingus Revival Lounge, Terminal 2 Arrivals Hall, beside baggage belt 6. This lounge is only available to Aer Lingus transatlantic business class guests. Your shirt or suit can be collected and steam pressed while you shower. Fresh towels and amenity kits are provided. Enjoy a coffee, juice and croissant before starting your day. TV/newspapers in the exclusive waiting area are also available to bring you up to speed on all the latest news.

And for those who really like their comfort:

  • 7 Dublin Airport Platinum Services, Terminals 1 & 2, . A 24-hour luxury private terminal, with on-demand services to meet your individual needs before and after your flight. Chauffeur service to and from your aircraft, private terminal entrance, check-in, security, immigration and luggage handling. Dedicated car park, luxury private suites, complimentary menu and refreshments, and shower facilities. €255 for a departure or arrival, €340 for a transfer within 3 hours, discounts for additional guests.

Music[edit]

The Arrivals Hall in Terminal 1 at Dublin Airport is now home to a 8 Schiller upright piano, which has been installed to encourage people of all ages and abilities to play. As the piano is in Arrivals it can be played both by passengers and by friends and family who are there to greet them. Those who play Dublin Airport’s piano are invited to share pictures and videos on social media using the hashtag #DublinAirportPiano and to tag @DublinAirport and @irishpianotuner in their posts.

Each Christmas, from around the 8th December until Christmas Eve (24th December), the airport hosts a festive entertainment programme. More than 1,600 performers from 50 schools, choirs and musical groups entertain passengers with two performances in each terminal daily. Groups performing include local schools such as Kilcoskan National School in the Ward, Mary Queen of Ireland National School in Toberburr and Thornleigh Educate Together in Swords, adult choirs such as Prosper Fingal, Voices of Hope and the Dublin Gospel Choir, and the Airport Police and Fire Service Band. The full programme of performances is announced on the airports website in early December (see 2019 programme here).

Exhibits[edit]

1 Temporary exhibitions are often hosted in the Food Court area of the Mezzanine level above the Terminal 1 Check-in hall.

The Press Photographers Association of Ireland (PPAI) usually holds their annual exhibition here each March/April. The exhibition contains the winning prints from the association’s annual awards, presented across nine stills categories as well as a prize for the best multi-media entry. The nine categories are: News, Daily Life and People, Arts and Entertainment, Portrait, Politics, Sports Action, Sports Feature, Nature and Environment and Reportage.

Art[edit]

The most well-known piece of artwork in Dublin Airport is probably the 2 Turning Point by Isabel Nolan. It is the centrepiece of Terminal 2 and was commissioned for the terminal's opening in 2010. The name is based on its location on the first floor of the terminal, where both arriving passengers exit from the baggage reclaim hall and departing passengers pass from the check-in hall below to the departures gates above.

In 2019, the airport commissioned the Sense of Place project, intended to allow passengers to experience Ireland at Dublin Airport and to instill a sense of Irishness within the airports spaces. The visual installations aim to deliver a refreshing space that is breath-taking and imaginative. Installations in the ‘Sense of Place’ series include:

  • 3 Vibrant Irish Light is an eye-catching spectrum of rainbow colours located on the passenger journey between Terminals 1 and 2.
  • 4 The Southern Cross tells the story of the first east-to-west transatlantic crossing by Captain Smithy in June 1930 which took off from Portmarnock Beach and flew to Newfoundland.
  • 5 All in a Name is located at the South Gates. It explores Irish surnames of seven real people and the places their surnames originated from, dating back to the 15th and 16th centuries.
  • 6 Rewriting History in Pier 2 features paintings of Eileen Gray, a leading member of the design movement, and Brendan Behan, Irish republican, poet and playwright.
  • 7 Irish Wildlife & Land at the Pier 2 bus gates details the animals, fauna and the environment featured in Irish mythology and wildlife, with a selected narrative from Irish poetry complementing the illustrated backdrop.
  • 8 40 Shades of Green is an art installation in the flight transfer facility, inspired by the song which was written by Johnny Cash while on a trip to Ireland.
  • 9 Light Years is a mural by renowned artist James Earley, which can be enjoyed by passengers transiting between Terminal 1 and Terminal 2. The concept focuses on the idea that time and light are intrinsically linked, light links our past to our present and our future.

Dublin Airport’s North Runway site entrance is hosting 10 art from St. Margaret’s National School’s entry to the Ivor Goodsite Hoarding Competition. The competition encourages children of all ages to design and create a mural or collection of images based on a theme of their choice on site hoardings in their locality.

Viewing opportunities[edit]

The best viewing opportunities within the terminals, listed from south to north, are:

  • The Terminal 2 shopping area (behind the Chocolate Lounge and the Slaney) provides a high level 1 view over Pier 4 and the main runway. This is the highest viewing point in the terminals, 20 metres above the apron, and is a good place to observe landings and take-offs, as well as activity along the Pier 4 stands.
  • The end of Pier 4, adjacent to Gate 426, is only 300 metres from the main runway, and provides panoramic 2 views of the south airfield and main runway, including all aircraft landing and taking off.
  • The circular Pier 3, while located further from the main runway, provides 3 360-degree views of the airfield and is a good location to observe ground activity on the airfield. The pier also has a clear view of the secondary runway, which is used during strong crosswinds.
  • The elevated link walkway to Pier 1 curves around the front of and provides a clear 4 view of the Original 1940 Central Terminal Building. This iconic curved building with its tiered floors was designed to echo the lines of a great ocean liner and won many architectural awards for its design. The architect of the building was Desmond FitzGerald, an elder brother of the former Taoiseach (Irish prime minister), Dr. Garret FitzGerald.
  • The north face of Pier 1 provides a clear 5 view of the north airfield. This view is only the north runway construction site, but from 2021 the new runway will come into operation only 400 metres from here, providing clear views of aircraft landing and taking off.

Eat and drink[edit]

Cafes and restaurants are available throughout the terminals and boarding gate areas, although many are temporarily closed due to the downturn in passengers caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The airport provides an up to date list of cafes and restaurants open on its website.

Hydration stations are provided in 18 locations throughout the terminals and boarding gate areas, where people can refill their own bottle free of charge.

A local oddity in Dublin Airport is Nect-Air Honey, harvested from four hives housing more than a quarter of a million Irish dark native honey bees on airport land. The natural Irish honey is exclusively available in Dublin Airport Lounges and in 340g jars to buy in Marqette restaurant in Terminal 1.

Before security[edit]

Terminal 1:

  • 1 Food Village, Terminal 1 Food Court, Upper Level. 08:00-15:00. A wide variety of food and drink offers including coffee, breakfast, salads, hot dishes, sandwiches, and pastries.
  • 2 McDonald’s, Terminal 1 Food Court, Upper Level. 24 hours. Offers customers its range of burgers, french fries, salads, a selection of sweet treats and a range of cold drinks and freshly ground coffee. Also has a dedicated Playland for children.
  • 3 Marqette, Terminal 1 Arrivals Level. 06:00-22:00. A bustling food market offering self-service, a la carte food, ready to go salads, sandwiches, soup, a full bar and an on-site bakery.
  • 4 Wrights Food Fayre, Terminal 1 Arrivals Level, Atrium Building. M-F 06:00-20:00. Convenience store located in the Terminal 1 Atrium, with a wide selection of hot and cold food, tea, coffee and essential grocery items.

Terminal 2:

  • 5 Caffé Nero, Terminal 2 Arrivals Level. 05:30-18:00. Coffee is roasted daily in the roaster. Every cup is ground fresh in store. With a wide range of teas, coffees, hot chocolate, salads and sandwiches.

After security[edit]

Terminal 1:

  • 6 Butlers Chocolate Café, Terminal 1 Departures, Main Shopping Street. 04:30-16:00. Choose from a complete menu of freshly prepared coffees and hot chocolate, all served with a complimentary chocolate. There is also a delicious range of artisan sweet treats and a range of gourmet sandwiches.
  • 7 Marqette, Terminal 1 Departures, Main Shopping Street. 04:00-21:00. A bustling food market offering self-service, a la carte food, ready to go salads, sandwiches, soup, a full bar and an on-site bakery.
  • 8 Café Bar, Terminal 1 Departures, 100's Gates Area. 04:30-12:00. Coffee outlet offering freshly baked pastries and sandwiches.

Terminal 2:

  • 9 Coffee Room, Terminal 2 Departures, Main Shopping Area. 05:00-13:30. Serving fresh coffee, teas, breakfast and a selection of baked goods, pastries and treats.
  • 10 Irish Meadows, Terminal 2 Departures, after US Preclearance. 07:00-Last Flight. Providing sandwiches, confectionary and coffees in the boarding gate area.

Buy[edit]

There are shopping areas after security in both terminals, although many shops are temporarily closed due to the downturn in passengers caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The airport provides an up to date list of shops open on its website. ATM's and Bureau de Change are provided in both terminals, see here for locations.

Terminal 1 Departures, after Security:

  • 1 Boots, +353 1 8447964. M-Sa 04:00-20:00, Su 04:30-20:00. Provides a one-stop shop for all your health and beauty must-haves. From sun protection, insect repellent and other travel basics. This Boots does not have a pharmaceutical dispensary.
  • 2 Dixons, +353 1 8447198. 06:00-18:00. Leading airport electrical retailer, with a specially selected range including cameras, smart devices, travel accessories and more. By calling the store up to 7 days before you travel you can reserve an item and buy before you fly.
  • 3 Pandora, +353 1 8067216. 04:30-17:00. Range of jewellery including hand-finished charms, bracelets, necklaces, rings and pendants.
  • 4 Parfois, +353 1 8067217. 05:00-17:00. Leading women’s fashion accessories brand with a range including handbags, jewellery, wallets, watches, sunglasses, scarves and much more. Airport discount of 10% on jewellery items.
  • 5 Sunglass Hut, +353 1 8141818. 05:00-18:00. Fashion, luxury and sports eyewear. Packed full of the hottest trends and styles, from brands such as Ray-Ban, Prada & Dolce&Gabbana. Airport discount of 23% on all items.
  • 6 Superdry, +353 1 8445723. 05:30-18:00. Contemporary brand which focuses on high-quality products that fuse vintage Americana and Japanese-inspired graphics with a British style. Airport discount of 15% on all items.
  • 7 The Loop. 04:00-21:00. Collection of brands and stores. From MAC, Jo Malone, Estee Lauder, Tom Ford, Victoria's Secret and Bobbi Brown to over 365 different whiskeys and a host of fashion and souvenirs plus a lot more.
  • 8 Wrights of Howth, +353 1 8144748. 04:30-17:30. Provide their famous wild Irish smoked salmon and fish products as well as a delicatessen selling a full range of all that is best in Irish food, including gift packs and hampers.

Terminal 2 Departures, After Security:

  • 9 The Loop. 04:00-19:00. Collection of brands and stores. From MAC, Jo Malone, Estee Lauder, Tom Ford, Victoria's Secret and Bobbi Brown to over 365 different whiskeys and a host of fashion and souvenirs plus a lot more.
  • 10 WHSmith, +353 1 9446403. 05:00-16:00. Selection of bestselling books, newspapers, and magazines to keep you entertained and a large range of travel accessories, food, drink and snacks.

Connect[edit]

Free Wi-Fi is available throughout the terminals on the "Dublin Airport Wi-Fi" network. It is a one-click free unlimited service, with no sign-up or registration required. Free charging stations are also located throughout the terminals.

GDPR compliant printing services are available at the bag wrap stations in the departures hall of both terminals, and at the left luggage facility in the Terminal 1 arrivals hall. The cost is €6 per boarding card.

Cope[edit]

COVID-19 testing facilities:

  • 1 RocDoc Health Check, Express Green Long Term Car Park, +353 1 969 7893. 08:00-19:00​. Pre-booked appointments, in-car testing facility & in-clinic testing facility available. PCR test €129 with results in 1-2 working days, LAMP test €149 with results in 12 hours, LAMP test express €199 with results in 5 hours, Antigen/rapid test €89 with results in 60 minutes.
    • 2 RocDoc North Terminal, North Terminal. 02:00-07:00​. Antigen testing facility to facilitate passengers travelling on the 05:55 and 07:00 flights to Amsterdam. In-clinic service only and pre-booking is essential.
  • 3 Randox, Terminal 2 Short Term Multi-Storey Car Park, +44 2890 394 286. 08:00-20:00​. Pre-booked appointments, tests performed in-clinic. PCR test €99 with results available the next day.

Luggage facilities:

  • 4 Excess Baggage Company, Terminal 1 Departures, adjacent to Check-in Area 7, +353 1 774 0882, . . Left luggage and baggage storage facility. Also provides bag wrapping with bag wrap machines, travel accessories and luggage for purchase.

Religious facilities:

  • 5 Church of Our Lady Queen of Heaven, Beside the Coach Park (Zone 14), +353 1 814 4340 (or in the event of an emergency +353 1 844 7283). ​Mass times M-F 13:00, Su 11:00. The Catholic Church was opened in 1964 and the present chaplain is Father Des Doyle.
  • 6 Multi-Faith Prayer Room, Terminal 2, Departures Level (beside entry to security). ​24 hours. The purpose of this facility is to allow people of all faiths, religions and spirituality have a sanctuary to retreat to.

Anyone in need of emergency medical aid should seek the assistance of an airport police officer or any member of the Dublin airport staff. There are no pharmaceutical dispensaries at Dublin Airport.

  • 7 Sensory Room, After security, before 400's gates. ​Advance Booking Required. A purpose-built Sensory Room for passengers with autism, dementia, cognitive impairment or other special needs. Depending on the passenger’s requirements, users will have the option to transform the room from a calming and relaxing environment to a stimulating interactive space full of light, colour and sound. Free.

Sleep[edit]

Hotels within the airport campus and nearby hotels on the north fringe of the city are listed below, these are all Mid-range or Splurge. For Budget options, see the Travelodge or Premier Inn in the nearby town of Swords, which are only 10 minutes from the airport with their own dedicated shuttle bus. There is also a range of other hotels and B&B’s available in Swords. If you have a longer stay with some time to explore Dublin, also consider the accommodation options in Dublin City Centre.

There are two hotels located within the airport campus:

Five hotels on the north fringe of the city also advertise themselves as airport hotels, and have courtesy buses:

Nearby[edit]

Neighbouring destinations

  • 1 Dublin Airport is shown on the map for easy of use.
  • 1 Dublin , the capital city of Ireland, is the obvious destination for any travellers arriving into Dublin Airport. Its vibrancy, nightlife and tourist attractions are world renowned and it's the most popular entry point for international visitors to Ireland.
  • 2 Swords is only 2km north of the airport, if you would prefer a closer option. It’s a rapidly expanding town with a range of shops, bars and restaurants and is well known for its vibrant nightlife, and several nightclubs, including Ireland's largest. Places of interest include the 13th century Swords Castle, the modern Swords Pavilions Shopping Centre, the large Ward River Valley Park and many golf courses.
  • 3 Malahide
  • 4 Booterstown University College Dublin on Wikipedia a coastal town and near to University College Dublin
  • 5 Ashbourne
  • 6 Howth
  • 7 Dún Laoghaire
  • 8 Dalkey
  • As the main gateway to Ireland, Dublin Airport is well connected to much of the island and there are an endless number of places to go next. See #Ground transportation above for a list of places.
This huge airport travel guide to Dublin Airport is a usable article. It has information on flights and ground transportation as well as some complete entries for food and beverage options at the airport. An adventurous person could use this article, but please feel free to improve it by editing the page.