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Europe > Britain and Ireland > United Kingdom > England > East of England > Norfolk (England) > North Norfolk

North Norfolk

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North Norfolk is an Outstanding Area of Natural Beauty (AONB) and district in Norfolk. The area is in East Anglia, a region in the East of England.

Towns and villages[edit]

Map of North Norfolk

Understand[edit]

A quiet backwater, and largely unspoilt coastal region. The landscape is mostly flat and agricultural populated by quaint, if unremarkable towns and villages. The real highlight is the coastline, which ranges from the sandy beaches of Sheringham and Cromer to the mudflats of Morston marshes.

Climate[edit]

North Norfolk
Climate chart (explanation)
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Precipitation+Snow totals in mm
Weyborne 5-day weather forecast UK Met Office
Imperial conversion
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Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation+Snow totals in inches

As for much of East Anglia the region is drier than more western areas. Being a costal area North Norfolk has a narrow temperature range than further inland and in summer can enjoy clloing sea breezes. Detailed information can be found on the UK Met Office Weyborne Climate page or UK Met Office East of England Climate page.

The Coast Road[edit]

Windmill and Harbour at Cley-Next-The-Sea on Norfolk's north coast.

The A149 is an 85-mile long road from King's Lynn to Great Yarmouth in the Norfolk Broads. From King's Lynn to Cromer the road follows the coastline. To access Cromer from King's Lynn, you can use the A148, passing through West Norfolk, Fakenham and Holt, but the A149 is a scenic route, following the coastline and passing through the small villages of North Norfolk. Not a recommended route for HGVs, tourists can use this road to go to a number of places, including many of the attractions mentioned in this article.

The road passes through the ever-changing, agricultural and coastal landscape of North Norfolk, and don't be surprised about the small narrow sections of road, namely in Stiffkey and Burnham Overy Staithe. Part of National Cycling Route 1 that runs along the North Norfolk Coastline uses the A149, a recommended local cycling route. A public bus service, the Coasthopper.

From west to east, the road passes through: Hunstanton, Old Hunstanton, Holme-next-the-Sea, Thornham, Titchwell, Brancaster, Brancaster Staithe, Burnham Deepdale, Burnham Norton, (Burnham Market is a few miles inland from here, and well worth a diversion. You can use the B1135 or B1105 to get there), Burnham Overy Staithe, Holkham, Wells-next-the-Sea, Stiffkey, Morston, Blakeney, Cley next the Sea, Salthouse, Weybourne, Kelling, Sheringham, West Runton, East Runton, Cromer.

Talk[edit]

The local dialect and accent is referred to as Broad Norfolk. The accent comes from Norfolk and is used by some locals. The accent is easy to understand, but there are some Norfolk Slang words that are a little different to the usual English language. As the local dialect developed independently from other dialects, areas of it can seem very different to other parts of East Anglia. See Norfolk#Talk

Get in[edit]

By train[edit]

Greater Anglia operate rail services between London Liverpool Street and King's Lynn stopping at Bishop's Stortford Cambridge and Ely. From London Liverpool Street, you can travel to Norwich. This service runs through both Essex and Suffolk, and South Norfolk. Greater Anglia operate services to Norwich from Cambridge calling at Ely and Thetford. From Norwich, there is a rail service to Cromer and Sheringham in North Norfolk. From the Broads you can use this service to get to North Norfolk. This service runs hourly through the day, see Greater Anglia Timetables for more information on this service, from Norwich to North Norfolk.

From London King's Cross, you can use First Capital Connect services to King's Lynn only, calling at Ely and Cambridge.

By car[edit]

Although there are no Motorways in Norfolk, there are plenty of roads into North Norfolk:

From London & the South: The M11 goes from London to Cambridge via Stansted Airport. From the M11, you can follow the A11 to Norfolk. The A1065 road runs through Swaffham to Fakenham

From Peterborough & the North: The A47 goes all the way to Norwich bypassing King's Lynn. The A149 goes from King's Lynn to North Norfolk

From Ipswitch & Felixtowe: The A140 runs from the A14 near Ipswich and Stowmarket, through Diss and Norwich to Cromer

From King's Lynn: This is the start of the A149, the Coast Road. This goes right round North Norfolk. For Cromer, you could use the A148, passing Fakenham.

From Norwich: The A140 goes through Aylsham right the way to Cromer, the A148 and A149. The A1067 goes from Norwich to Fakenham, with connecting roads going to Wells-next-the-Sea.

The A1065 goes through Swaffham all the way to the A148 at Fakenham, and is the main connecting road from the A11.

By bus[edit]

National Express operates one daily service in and out of the region:

Get around[edit]

By bus[edit]

Norfolk County Council co-ordinate several rural bus routes which serve local residents and tourists.

The most useful route for exploring the North Norfolk coast is the Coasthopper which operates every two hours throughout the year and hourly during the summer season from Hunstanton to Sheringham, following the A149 and calling at all villages en route. Day tickets ('Rovers') are available on the bus, and combined tickets with the Bittern railway line from Sheringham and Cromer to Norwich - such as the Bittern Line Rover - allow a family of four to travel between the coast and Norwich for only £10 return.

Sanders Coaches and First Eastern Counties also run regular services from Norwich to the towns and villages of the region.

By train[edit]

In addition to the Bittern Line (which is part of the National Rail network) detailed above, The Poppy Line is the name of the preserved railway which is run by the North Norfolk Railway from Holt to Sheringham, where the Poppy Line station is just a short walk from the National Rail station for services to Norwich. The train station in Holt is a couple of miles from the town centre, but there is a horse-drawn cart from the town to the station called the Holt Flyer. Depending on the season, Poppy Line trains run approximately hourly. Some trains are steam-powered, some are diesel-powered.

On foot[edit]

The Norfolk Coast Path long distance footpath (84 miles) runs from Hunstanton to Hopton-on-Sea (between Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft), closely following the coastline.

See[edit]

Take a ferry to see the Common and Grey seals at Blakeney Point.

Do[edit]

Eat[edit]

Famous for locally caught seafood including Cromer Crabs.

Drink[edit]

Most towns and villages in the area have pubs & restaurants. In the coastal villages there are often cafes and tea rooms serving traditional tea (or coffee) and cakes.

Sleep[edit]

  • There are YHA Hostels at Wells-next-the-Sea, Sheringham and Hunstanton.
  • The coast is popular with holiday makers and there are many hotels, B&Bs, guest houses, camp sites, etc. in the area. If only staying one night, check before booking accommodation as some B&Bs and guest houses have minimum stays.

Stay safe[edit]

In case of emergency at sea, dial 999 (or 112) and ask for "Coastguard".

There is a lifeguard service at Cromer, Sheringham, Mundesley and Sea Palling. This operates daily from June until the first week in September, from 10AM to 6PM. The lifeguarded zone is defined by red and yellow flags on the beach, with the beach lifeguard station also flying a red and yellow flag. Do not swim if a red flag is flying.

On occasion live ammunition and unexploded bombs from World War II have been found on the coast. If you do come across a suspicious item leave it alone and report it to the coast guard.

This is a tidal region so be careful, especially with young children.

This park travel guide to North Norfolk is a usable article. It has information about the park, for getting in, about a few attractions, and about accommodations in the park. An adventurous person could use this article, but please feel free to improve it by editing the page.